How-To: Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Versa - Nissan Versa Forums
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#1 Old 07-14-2011, 05:16 PM
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How-To: Replace the Front Brake Pads on a Versa

Hey guys and gals!

First and foremost I would like to express how great it is to finally join such an active and friendly Versa forum. I look forward to interacting with all of you at some point or another

Now onto my first post! I recently changed the front brake pads on my '07 Versa hatch so I wanted to share a simple write-up with you guys. The job only took me an hour or so to accomplish and I saved a TON of cash compared to what the dealer would have charged me.

As for parts, I recommend sticking with OEM brake pads unless you track your Versa on a regular basis. May vendors sell brake pad kits that range from $100 to the OEM kit I bought for $59 at nissanpartszone.com. Ensure that you decide what kind of brake pad kit best suits your driving style and shop around for the best price possible!


--The Procedure--

Step one: Ensure your vehicle is safely secured in park or in gear for standard transmissions. Next engage the safety brake, and get something to block the rear wheels from moving forward while jacking up the front end.

Step two: Remove hubcap or other locking systems. Next using either a specified tool or the equipped tire iron, loosen all the bolts on the first front tire; either left or right. Once the bolts are sufficiently loose you can proceed to jack the front end. Refer to your owner manual if you are unsure where to place the jack, since most vehicles have a specific jacking point when using the included jack.

Step three: Complete the tire removal by completely removing all the bolts. Once the tire is removed you will be able to see the rotor and brake calipers. The rotor is round and has a very shinny surface that may appear to have grooves much like a record album.

Step four: On the opposite side of the brake caliper (this is what holds the brake pads and applies the pressure to the braking system) you will find two bolts that hold the caliper to the fixed calliper mount. Note: in most cases the caliper mounting bolts will not have to be completely removed, but loosened enough to free the caliper assembly.

Step five: After loosening the caliper mounting bolts the caliper may appear to still be attached to the caliper mount. Using a small hammer or a screwdriver you can tap the caliper or gently pry the assembly, which at this time should lift up.
Note: some automakers have a hook on the brake pads that may hold the pads securely in place. It might take a bit more force to pop them out, but you will be able to tell this once you have the assembly apart.

Step six: Gently pull the caliper up, so not to kink the brake line. There should be enough brake line to allow you to rest it on the caliper mount, if not use an electrical tie to hold it in place so it is out of your way. The first brake pad is actually resting on the back with a metal prong holding it in place. The second pad has a male prong that is inserted directly into the brake caliper cylinder.

Step seven: Remove the brake pads using a screwdriver or whatever is necessary and you will now have a completely disassembled braking caliper. Next the cylinder must be compressed in order to allow sufficient room to allow the new brake pads to be properly fitted. You can purchase a specific tool for the job, but I have always found a simple C-clamp does the job just fine. Take the clamp and fit it so one end is holding onto the caliper mount, and the other is placed on the edge of the cylinder. Begin closing the clamp and the cylinder should begin to sink inward until it is completely flush with the inner part of the caliper mount.

Step eight: Whew, your almost there! Next insert your new brake pads; and basically at this point you are reversing the process that you encountered with the removal.

Be sure to double-check all bolts to ensure that they are securely tightened. After completing a complete inspection and your tire has been replaced it is best to hand tighten the lug-nuts before lowering the vehicle. Once the vehicle is grounded start tightening the opposite nuts to ensure the bolts are tightened equally.

Lastly before you drive off with your newly changed brakes, take a moment to pump your brakes several times, but don't be alarmed when at first it feels the brakes are failing. As the brake cylinder properly adjusts normal braking will resume although sensitivity will be increased due to the freshly installed pads. Pumping prior to driving may likely eliminate experiencing this condition, but either way use caution until normal braking control is established.
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#2 Old 08-13-2011, 09:45 AM
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If I may add to this. at step seven if you use a c-clamp or for that matter a big pair of channel locks to compress the caliper plunger you can use one of the old brake pads as a base so you compress the caliper evenly.

also while you have the old pads out there is a bracket that holds the rotor on and what the caliper bolts too. these pins have little rubber boots on them and are designed to move as the brakes wear. make sure these 2 pins move freely. good set of directions MeVersa.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeVersaTheWorld View Post
Hey guys and gals!


First and foremost I would like to express how great it is to finally join such an active and friendly Versa forum. I look forward to interacting with all of you at some point or another

Now onto my first post! I recently changed the front brake pads on my '07 Versa hatch so I wanted to share a simple write-up with you guys. The job only took me an hour or so to accomplish and I saved a TON of cash compared to what the dealer would have charged me.

As for parts, I recommend sticking with OEM brake pads unless you track your Versa on a regular basis. May vendors sell brake pad kits that range from $100 to the OEM kit I bought for $59 at nissanpartszone.com. Ensure that you decide what kind of brake pad kit best suits your driving style and shop around for the best price possible!


--The Procedure--

Step one: Ensure your vehicle is safely secured in park or in gear for standard transmissions. Next engage the safety brake, and get something to block the rear wheels from moving forward while jacking up the front end.

Step two: Remove hubcap or other locking systems. Next using either a specified tool or the equipped tire iron, loosen all the bolts on the first front tire; either left or right. Once the bolts are sufficiently loose you can proceed to jack the front end. Refer to your owner manual if you are unsure where to place the jack, since most vehicles have a specific jacking point when using the included jack.

Step three: Complete the tire removal by completely removing all the bolts. Once the tire is removed you will be able to see the rotor and brake calipers. The rotor is round and has a very shinny surface that may appear to have grooves much like a record album.

Step four: On the opposite side of the brake caliper (this is what holds the brake pads and applies the pressure to the braking system) you will find two bolts that hold the caliper to the fixed calliper mount. Note: in most cases the caliper mounting bolts will not have to be completely removed, but loosened enough to free the caliper assembly.

Step five: After loosening the caliper mounting bolts the caliper may appear to still be attached to the caliper mount. Using a small hammer or a screwdriver you can tap the caliper or gently pry the assembly, which at this time should lift up.
Note: some automakers have a hook on the brake pads that may hold the pads securely in place. It might take a bit more force to pop them out, but you will be able to tell this once you have the assembly apart.

Step six: Gently pull the caliper up, so not to kink the brake line. There should be enough brake line to allow you to rest it on the caliper mount, if not use an electrical tie to hold it in place so it is out of your way. The first brake pad is actually resting on the back with a metal prong holding it in place. The second pad has a male prong that is inserted directly into the brake caliper cylinder.

Step seven: Remove the brake pads using a screwdriver or whatever is necessary and you will now have a completely disassembled braking caliper. Next the cylinder must be compressed in order to allow sufficient room to allow the new brake pads to be properly fitted. You can purchase a specific tool for the job, but I have always found a simple C-clamp does the job just fine. Take the clamp and fit it so one end is holding onto the caliper mount, and the other is placed on the edge of the cylinder. Begin closing the clamp and the cylinder should begin to sink inward until it is completely flush with the inner part of the caliper mount.

Step eight: Whew, your almost there! Next insert your new brake pads; and basically at this point you are reversing the process that you encountered with the removal.

Be sure to double-check all bolts to ensure that they are securely tightened. After completing a complete inspection and your tire has been replaced it is best to hand tighten the lug-nuts before lowering the vehicle. Once the vehicle is grounded start tightening the opposite nuts to ensure the bolts are tightened equally.

Lastly before you drive off with your newly changed brakes, take a moment to pump your brakes several times, but don't be alarmed when at first it feels the brakes are failing. As the brake cylinder properly adjusts normal braking will resume although sensitivity will be increased due to the freshly installed pads. Pumping prior to driving may likely eliminate experiencing this condition, but either way use caution until normal braking control is established.
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#3 Old 10-15-2011, 12:53 AM
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Great write up MeVersa. I like to open the break fluid reservoir and remove about 1/3 of the content prior to compressing the caliper piston. I believe this step makes compression much easier and since some fluid was removed you don't run the risk of spill some or the content while the reservoir is open.

It is better to have lived and lost, than to listen to another record, by Olivia Newton John.
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#4 Old 05-15-2012, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeVersaTheWorld View Post
Hey guys and gals!

First and foremost I would like to express how great it is to finally join such an active and friendly Versa forum. I look forward to interacting with all of you at some point or another

Now onto my first post! I recently changed the front brake pads on my '07 Versa hatch so I wanted to share a simple write-up with you guys. The job only took me an hour or so to accomplish and I saved a TON of cash compared to what the dealer would have charged me.

As for parts, I recommend sticking with OEM brake pads unless you track your Versa on a regular basis. May vendors sell brake pad kits that range from $100 to the OEM kit I bought for $59 at nissanpartszone.com. Ensure that you decide what kind of brake pad kit best suits your driving style and shop around for the best price possible!


--The Procedure--

Step one: Ensure your vehicle is safely secured in park or in gear for standard transmissions. Next engage the safety brake, and get something to block the rear wheels from moving forward while jacking up the front end.

Step two: Remove hubcap or other locking systems. Next using either a specified tool or the equipped tire iron, loosen all the bolts on the first front tire; either left or right. Once the bolts are sufficiently loose you can proceed to jack the front end. Refer to your owner manual if you are unsure where to place the jack, since most vehicles have a specific jacking point when using the included jack.

Step three: Complete the tire removal by completely removing all the bolts. Once the tire is removed you will be able to see the rotor and brake calipers. The rotor is round and has a very shinny surface that may appear to have grooves much like a record album.

Step four: On the opposite side of the brake caliper (this is what holds the brake pads and applies the pressure to the braking system) you will find two bolts that hold the caliper to the fixed calliper mount. Note: in most cases the caliper mounting bolts will not have to be completely removed, but loosened enough to free the caliper assembly.

Step five: After loosening the caliper mounting bolts the caliper may appear to still be attached to the caliper mount. Using a small hammer or a screwdriver you can tap the caliper or gently pry the assembly, which at this time should lift up.
Note: some automakers have a hook on the brake pads that may hold the pads securely in place. It might take a bit more force to pop them out, but you will be able to tell this once you have the assembly apart.

Step six: Gently pull the caliper up, so not to kink the brake line. There should be enough brake line to allow you to rest it on the caliper mount, if not use an electrical tie to hold it in place so it is out of your way. The first brake pad is actually resting on the back with a metal prong holding it in place. The second pad has a male prong that is inserted directly into the brake caliper cylinder.

Step seven: Remove the brake pads using a screwdriver or whatever is necessary and you will now have a completely disassembled braking caliper. Next the cylinder must be compressed in order to allow sufficient room to allow the new brake pads to be properly fitted. You can purchase a specific tool for the job, but I have always found a simple C-clamp does the job just fine. Take the clamp and fit it so one end is holding onto the caliper mount, and the other is placed on the edge of the cylinder. Begin closing the clamp and the cylinder should begin to sink inward until it is completely flush with the inner part of the caliper mount.

Step eight: Whew, your almost there! Next insert your new brake pads; and basically at this point you are reversing the process that you encountered with the removal.

Be sure to double-check all bolts to ensure that they are securely tightened. After completing a complete inspection and your tire has been replaced it is best to hand tighten the lug-nuts before lowering the vehicle. Once the vehicle is grounded start tightening the opposite nuts to ensure the bolts are tightened equally.

Lastly before you drive off with your newly changed brakes, take a moment to pump your brakes several times, but don't be alarmed when at first it feels the brakes are failing. As the brake cylinder properly adjusts normal braking will resume although sensitivity will be increased due to the freshly installed pads. Pumping prior to driving may likely eliminate experiencing this condition, but either way use caution until normal braking control is established.
I know im kindda late with this but i would like you credit you for such an informative thought and instructions. Some versas do have different parts location and definitely would be needing a diagram to get the issue fixed on the step by step process...
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