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post #1 of 5 Old 07-19-2017, 11:03 PM Thread Starter
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2009 Versa CVT fluid

I'm looking to change the fluid, looking for first hand experience on how much they take for a drain and fill. All of the listings I've seen are dry capacity.
I'm assuming it's between 4-5L but would like to know for sure before I buy it.
Also does anyone have any experience with aftermarket fluids? I've used Eneos and other aftermarket fluids in other Jatco trans without any issues. Just wondering if anyone has experience with aftermarket fluids.
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post #2 of 5 Old 07-20-2017, 01:28 AM
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Does anybody even make aftermarket CVT fluid? I've used others too in ATX but the requirements of that chain to sheave wear thing are such that I would be staying VERY narrow eyed with regards to aftermarket fluids, it would have to mimic the Nissan fluid perfectly. And then I would want it out in the field for a while to show any potential issues.

Ever heard of the Mercon/Mercon V interchange fiasco Ford choked itself with? Cost them thousands......................if not more.

On normal ATX the fluid formulation is picked more for the clutch material than anything else, the seals and metal and other parts pretty much are the same trans to trans but the clutch material is not. Then past that just like the engine oil getting lighter in weight the ATX oils are too to improve mileage.

Add to that the CVT metal chain running on the two pulley halves, the gripping point there is extremely localized when the pulley is not adjusting and making for extreme loading in a very small area. Yet the fluid still has to be able to fill and purge faster than spit in and out of the clutch packs. I'd be willing to bet there are some very proprietary extreme pressure additives used there to have that fluid be both very strong under load yet light enough to work clutches.

Last edited by amc49; 07-20-2017 at 01:37 AM.
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post #3 of 5 Old 07-21-2017, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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There are many aftermarket fluids that meet or exceed OE specs, that applies to mostly everything.
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post #4 of 5 Old 07-25-2017, 05:16 AM
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I would not be too sure of that, I had fits simply finding a correct specced fluid that worked on my '11 Versa normal ATX not a CVT not 4 months ago. I found plenty of fluids all right, just none with the correct spec listed, all listed the previous one but not the one I needed. That's death with ATX clutchpacks if you happen to be unlucky. There can be multiple spec sets now in only one manufacturer, look at Nissan; they have at least 5 now by themselves.

What I meant about that Mercon issue I mentioned above. Ford ate thousands of torn up ATX when they said the later V fluid interchanged in with the earlier non-V..............then it didn't. Then they sh-t bricks for a year sending out warnings to all the dealers, the fluid had to be all yanked and completely reformulated. Then and ONLY then did it truly interchange, and some aftermarket makers had the bad stuff on the shelves (since they had copied the original 'bad' Ford spec too) for a couple more years as they refused to yank it all. So, lots of transmissions out there died way ahead of time and the owner no wiser.

The difference in Mercon III and V was in clutchpack material only, the V was needed with the new 'high energy' clutch materials and if III used the trans tore up, the move made in the middle of like '98 and tore up more of them. Some confusion though as the fluid flipped to synthetic too. I rebuilt a trans around '07 that used the old clutches previously and had to upgrade to the new fluid with the new clutches, it worked well, trans is still running fine today.

I found that the super expensive 'superfluids' that claimed to run in anything often caused problems, people were constantly bitching about them when I was in parts. My view is past a certain point you can have additive clash there.

And now some are even changing the basic viscosity which has been 10 weight since like the '50s, that alone can easily tilt your shift strategies wonky as the VB control orifices are based on that weight. So, if say a fluid says it fits the Ford spec both V and LV, well, you won't catch ME using that crap. Buyer beware I say.

Do what you will and what most usually do but don't cry if you get bit. ATX last short enough now as it is as compared to what they used to. I'm still used to 8-10 years or more use apiece and even on the ones I rebuild, I won't be giving up on that.

Last edited by amc49; 07-25-2017 at 05:26 AM.
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post #5 of 5 Old 07-25-2017, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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You still haven't answered any of my questions.
So far I found Eneos makes 2 ns-2 compatible fluids.
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