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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys, my fans are not coming on at opperating temperature. I originally thought i had an emissions issue to realizing somethings causing my cooling(radiator) fan not to power on, I have replaced both my thermostats and my ect sensor, have also pulled a fan from a junk yard, thought im positive my old one was fine, replaced my radiator new. Checked all of my relay fuses, replaced my all of my other small fuses, and fan fuse. Tested my harness to my ect for a 5v reference. Replaced my spark plugs and coil packs, evap canister purge valve and pcv valve aswell. Purchased and obd2 scanner down the road upon replacing these things, car runs til it hits 161F then cuts off with my ac on full blast with it off gets up to 179F. Also replaced my fuel pump, battery, crankshaft sensor and camshaft sensor.
 

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Hello Wazzoouuski, and welcome to forms.

I'm having a tough time understanding the problem your describing. Is your concern that your cooling fans are not turning on?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well more or less internment shutdown issues, my fan(low and high) comes on when it is tested(using automated 10 times button pushed door test). I can drive about 10 minutes before my car shuts off, while my car has been idle, my fans do not kick on at all. Am going to check out my crankshaft pos sensor to see if that part may have been faulty.
 

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When you say "Shuts off" does that mean stall, or do you lose all electronics in the car?
After the car shuts off, can you restart it right away without much problems?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Loss of power(sputtery as if I let off accel) to dying out completely to not cranking back up. Noticed that when I run vehicle with A/C and it cuts off I can lower or even shut off A/C for slightly more time to run before shutting back off.
 

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Any chance you have a scan tool to read live data? I'm wondering what your fuel trims are.

If you start the car and let it idle in a driveway, will it eventually stall out? If this is a yes, then I have some ideas to try.

I don't think it's an over heating issue, your not seeing the red light warning of engine temperature turning on are you?
What I think is happening, is as the engine bay under the hood get warmed up, it's causing a component to fail with the heat soak from the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Idle stall out: yes
time is aprox 30 - 40 mins
I own an obd2 scanner, fuel trim seems to open and close fine(not fully knowledged of everything I'm looking at), which my fuel pump was my first assumption due to similiar issue with my truck before. Only code i got going is my crankshaft sensor is high circuit, did uninstall and reinstall, did not clear code. Oil was in the hole the sensor goes into(not fully knowledged on everythings functionalities, figured probably was normal. Going to take a look at it tomorrow. So if you got some ideas I'll try to be active as I go about other things on here.
 

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I think you've answered your own question.

Only code i got going is my crankshaft sensor is high circuit, did uninstall and reinstall, did not clear code.
 

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The crankshaft position sensor code is pointing to 1 of 4 causes.
1- The sensor has failed.
2- wiring issue
3-the tone ring around the crankshaft has some how failed. (This is unlikely because the car does run for a few minutes)
4- car computer issue.

I'm assuming it's #1 or #2. Because #3 and #4 gets costly.

First, after replacing the sensor did you use your code reader to clear the code. After did the code come back after your car stalls?

Next inspect the wire connectors for the sensor. Look for any green oxidation within the connector.

Next check the wires for the sensor, You will need a multi meter. here is a good video.

Also, while the car is running, CAREFULLY wiggle the wires that go to the sensor. Be careful as there are lots of moving parts under the hood.
 

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The fan likely does not come on until over 200 degrees.

If the crank sensor is one that must be carefully set then you get more error after removing it, it must be set.

Learn to tune a car up, the basic requirement to do it has never gone away and likely the cause of the car dying. There are easily 30 other things that can be going wrong there. Most will pop no code at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey guys, was unable to post the update with what happened, but I replaced the sensor and jts not wanting to turn over now, going to double check my work then see if it's possible I'd have gotten a faulty crank sensor
 

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If I'm understanding you correctly, and your getting a no-crank situation?
Are you getting any kinda of noise when attempting to start? clicking? buzzing? dash or head lights?
I don't believe a faulty crank sensor would stop a car from truing over. Starting yes, but not Turing over, that's all starter and ignition.

For a no-crank situation, this is what I would do.
1) Confirm you have a good battery, If it's easy enough, take it to an auto-parts store and have it load tested.
2) I would clean and tighten your battery cables.
3) Does your car have a "Chipped" key?
a) when the car key is in the ignition and turned to accessory mode, is the security light on?
b) Try a different key.
4) See if your getting voltage to the starter when you try and start the car?
5) And as you mention, re-check your work.
 

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Probably at least 90% if the time when there's a no crank situation the cause is either dirty/corroded posts/terminals or loose battery terminals. I've even cleaned them for people in parking lots when their car wouldn't crank and they had no idea why. After a cleaning they'd get in the car and it would start right up. If the engine is turning over but not starting it could be you got a bad CPS or forgot to plug in the sensor when you finished. It's easy to get busy and anxious to see if you've resolved the problem and forget to plug something back in. You should also check the condition of the wiring harness/connector for loose or frayed wires. Once after working on a car I forgot to plug the 02 sensor back up. The CEL came on immediately and even before looking under the hood I was pretty sure I'd forgot to plug it back in. Plugged it in, reset the ECU and everything was fine. I was doing an oil change awhile back and started pouring the oil back in the crankcase when I suddenly remembered I didn't put the plug back in the pan. I lost about 6oz. of oil before remembering. In 43 years of owning cars and doing my own oil changes I think that's the 2nd time I've done that. I always take the drain plug out and while the pan is draining I change the filter. let it finish draining, then put the plug back in. That day I pulled the drain pan out from under the car and forgot to put the plug back in. After I finish the oil change I always start the car, watch for the oil pressure light to go out, then check for leaks before backing off the ramps.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
inccorect.. My issue is intermittent stalling, vehicle not reaching fan opperating temp. Put the old sensor on and immediately found my issue, the new sensor did not make a sealing(popping) noise as to where the old one did(though I most definitely replaced it before. What would be the CPK reciever on a 07 nissan versa? The video mentioned a possible 2nd CPK sensor? could not disconnect wire harness for my cpk sensor to be tested, but it starts up therefore it is getting power and the cpk sensor i originally replaced was good. Looked at my engine ground connections, they are covered in debris, as is most the engine, took the time today to take apart my air intake system to have it cleaned, was really mucky inside, along with the throttle body. I think I have an ecm issue on my hands, gonna try taking it to Nissan if you guys can't get me right lol. This car is a disaster, I love it but it needs body work still after I get the engine right.
 

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It might be a good idea to clean all those ground connection problems. Poor grounding can cause a multitude of problems too.
 

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You likely have no ECM issue but everybody thinks they do. I used to sell them and believe me when I say that 95% of the buyers later came back wanting their money back when the new ECM either doesn't cure the problem at all or they find out you have to pay to get the new ECM key-coded so that ignition will work. Thinking you need an ECM is the common mark of somebody who knows little about cars. You have no more ideas but literally a hundred things can still be wrong there.

The stat that works the fan does NOT open until 200+ degrees, I've already said that once. It can be normal to have fans never come on in winter, I have LEDs hooked to my fans and the car can go weeks without ever turning the fans on unless a/c is on. There are TWO stats in the car.

NORMAL.

'...the new sensor did not make a sealing(popping) noise as to where the old one did...'

The mark of a cheap crap Chinese sensor that likely has varied from the blueprint points in space to click the sensor connector in place as required. It often can be modded to work fine but you have to look close to determine the issue making the connector not fit right. I've fixed many of all types to then work fine and forever.
 

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but I replaced the sensor and jts not wanting to turn over now
Ok Sorry for the confusion. I though that you had replace the sensor, and now the car wouldn't start.
I'm just trying to understand the problem.

I agree with others here, I would not consider the fans not turning on an issue unless your car is actually overheating.

Ok, so we are back to a intermittent stalling issue after the car comes up to normal operating temperature.
Do you still have the crankshaft sensor is high circuit code that won't clear?
Have you tried wiggling the crankshaft sensor wiring, and the wiring near the Car's computer while the car is running?

I re-read all of your posts, and I'm currently thinking it maybe "Heat Soak" issue. Some electronic component under your hood is getting warm and temporary failing.
1) When there is a load on the engine (A/C) The stall out happens faster.
2) When driving it happens in about 10 mins, 30-40 minutes sitting at an idle.
 

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If the grounds are dirty/corroded you should clean them. Dirty/poor ground can cause a multitude of problems. As far as the cooling fan not coming on if you're in a cold climate it's very possible the coolant never reaches the temperature needed for the fans. My '16 Versa has a 180* thermostat and I assume that's what your Versa has. The thermostat opens when the temperature reaches 180*, in cool/cold weather the coolant temperature will drop back down pretty quickly and even quicker if the heat is on I don't know at what temperature the fans will kick on at on the Versa but I'd expect it to be over 200*. If I recall correctly on my Ford Escort with a 190* thermostat the fan doesn't come on until the coolant reaches 212*. I seldom hear the fan running on my Escort even in 90*+ weather unless I'm stuck in stop and go traffic. The fan not running could be a sign of a cooling system that is working as it should. If you have an infrared thermometer check the temperature of the upper radiator hose or the thermostat housing and you'll know within a few degrees what the coolant temperature is running. I have an Ultra Gauge hooked up in my '16 Versa and it gives me the coolant temperature that's being reported to the ECU. During this past summer with temperatures in the mid/upper 90's the hottest I ever saw the coolant temperature was either 185* or 186* I don't remember for sure which. Until the outdoor temperatures reach into the 90's my Versa temperature usually reads 183.2* on the Ultra Gauge. This tells me the cooling system is working exactly as it should the thermostat is opening when it should and the air flow through the radiator is sufficient to keep the temperature as it should be. From 1993 until about 2012 I drove an '88 Ford Escort as my daily driver. Several years before I quit driving it the cooling fan quit operating automatically as it should. I wired it directly to the battery and put a toggle switch in it to turn the fan on. At the time I drove in Charlotte, NC where there was often lots of stop and go traffic on nearly a daily basis and I wouldn't usually turn the fan on until the temperature gauge I'd installed in it was reading 220*. Even letting it get that warm before turning the fan on it had over 500K miles on it when I quit driving it and I never had any problems with the head gasket.
 

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We are arguing two different cooling systems there, one has the 2 stats and the other doesn't. The earlier one with two stats is NOT temperature controlled by the thermostat per se, it is open before the other true controlling stat of 200 degrees. THAT second one is the true temperature control for the fans and other things. It is called the 'water control valve' and is in the water outlet located at driver end of engine block with hose going to the top of the radiator. The part called thermostat is actually only a supply routing device and needs to be open before the other one (180 degrees) and why it is a lower temp one.

'16 model only has one stat and that one is not nearly as accurate as it is indirectly posited in the middle of a long water temp moderation bypass log that runs alongside the block. The stat in water outlet is now gone and likely some restriction going on to approximate what the previous stat did.

That last system is utterly whacky and I'm trying to figure out what Nissan was trying to do there. You do NOT sense overall engine coolant temp right where you add the cooler amount (it pollutes your temp readings to be wildly incorrect) yet that is exactly what they have done and the opposite of cooling system design for 100 years.

Unless of course you WANT to fool people into thinking the engines are running cooler than they really are (my conspiracy gene is kicking on again).

At the very least the dropping of one stat allowed Nissan to give Carlos Ghozn another million dollar bonus, but if I did it I would have dropped the one at the lower rad, the one they call the thermostat, the water control valve in that earlier system is what truly controls engine temp and run like the last one with only one stat the system becomes exactly the same as the Ford one mentioned on Escort, it is the same on all Focus cars too.

The 'Rule of McDonald's' figures in there somewhere as applied to engineers, I'm sure.

FYI, the Ford engines ran so long because the water temps were raised from 190ish to over 210 degrees. When you run the temp that high any water in the oil boils off to get sucked out the PCV. Look under the valve covers to see how little sludge (you must have water in the oil to make sludge) is under them. I have engines with over 200K miles on them and the covers still are silver bare metal as is the rest of the head. Engines that run at lower temperatures NEVER stay that clean. The normal Focus engine temps were 210-220 and they run forever like that.
 

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We are arguing two different cooling systems there, one has the 2 stats and the other doesn't. The earlier one with two stats is NOT temperature controlled by the thermostat per se, it is open before the other true controlling stat of 200 degrees. THAT second one is the true temperature control for the fans and other things. It is called the 'water control valve' and is in the water outlet located at driver end of engine block with hose going to the top of the radiator. The part called thermostat is actually only a supply routing device and needs to be open before the other one (180 degrees) and why it is a lower temp one.

'16 model only has one stat and that one is not nearly as accurate as it is indirectly posited in the middle of a long water temp moderation bypass log that runs alongside the block. The stat in water outlet is now gone and likely some restriction going on to approximate what the previous stat did.

That last system is utterly whacky and I'm trying to figure out what Nissan was trying to do there. You do NOT sense overall engine coolant temp right where you add the cooler amount (it pollutes your temp readings to be wildly incorrect) yet that is exactly what they have done and the opposite of cooling system design for 100 years.

Unless of course you WANT to fool people into thinking the engines are running cooler than they really are (my conspiracy gene is kicking on again).

At the very least the dropping of one stat allowed Nissan to give Carlos Ghozn another million dollar bonus, but if I did it I would have dropped the one at the lower rad, the one they call the thermostat, the water control valve in that earlier system is what truly controls engine temp and run like the last one with only one stat the system becomes exactly the same as the Ford one mentioned on Escort, it is the same on all Focus cars too.

The 'Rule of McDonald's' figures in there somewhere as applied to engineers, I'm sure.

FYI, the Ford engines ran so long because the water temps were raised from 190ish to over 210 degrees. When you run the temp that high any water in the oil boils off to get sucked out the PCV. Look under the valve covers to see how little sludge (you must have water in the oil to make sludge) is under them. I have engines with over 200K miles on them and the covers still are silver bare metal as is the rest of the head. Engines that run at lower temperatures NEVER stay that clean. The normal Focus engine temps were 210-220 and they run forever like that.
I'm not familiar with the 2 thermostat systems. Didn't know some Nissan had it and I've never owned a vehicle that used it. I suspect part of the reason Nissan is using the 180* thermostats in the newer models vs. 190-195* thermostats other manufacturers use is because the CVT cooler is water cooled using the engine coolant and we all know heat is the enemy of any automatic transmission. I've even considered adding a standard air cooled transmission cooler to my Versa but I wonder what the effects of the cold temps in the winter would have on the transmission and whether it would create problems.
 
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