Nissan Versa Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The car has around 700 miles and it whines during what is equivalent to 2-3rd gear on an ordinary automatic. Sounds like "wheeeee-ooooh'. Lasts for around 5-6 seconds during acceleration. It did not make this sound the first 100-200 miles. Otherwise there is no persistent whine or continuous whine at any speed, only during this short period during acceleration. Is this normal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
The duration of the sound you describe is a little concerning. My 15 sedan makes a similar noise only not 5-6 seconds. I'm guessing your probably OK..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
The car has around 700 miles and it whines during what is equivalent to 2-3rd gear on an ordinary automatic. Sounds like "wheeeee-ooooh'. Lasts for around 5-6 seconds during acceleration. It did not make this sound the first 100-200 miles. Otherwise there is no persistent whine or continuous whine at any speed, only during this short period during acceleration. Is this normal?
See if you can get the dealer to swap you out for one that doesn't make that noise. 2014 Versa SL with CVT here, we just had our CVT swapped out at 45,000 miles under warranty. I wrote Nissan a letter I will mail this weekend that they need to up the power train warranty on their cars to 100,000 miles. Ours started acting "funny" at around the 3,000 mile mark after the first oil change at the dealership and was never the same since. The odd behaviors were "normal" according to the dealership until they no longer were, such as a substantial loss of power at highway speeds. If our first CVT lasted 45,000 miles, we'll be sure to get rid of ours before it hits the 70,000 mile mark just for some room for margin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
<our first CVT lasted 45,000 miles, we'll be sure to get rid of ours before it hits the 70,000 ...>

Lots of people are getting burned by Nissan's CVTs. But, new buyers keep lining up, unaware of what lies ahead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Well you know, I dumped a 2000 Honda Accord with V-6 for my 2016 Nissan Note. The Honda camp likes to badmouth Nissans for the CVT fiasco, but Hondas have their share of tranny problems with their constant mesh trannies. Same deal as the CVTs, having to pay $3000-4500 for a tranny replacement. One well known Honda repair shop in town told me even the new Hondas have tranny problems. The tranny in the Accord I had would not shift into D unless the engine was warmed up, so it was on it's last legs. I am an old school hot rodder so I've built race engines and take pride in rebuilding automatic trannies. I've done a Ford AOD and most recently, the tranny in the Honda - just for fun. Got a core out of a wreck. As I ended up getting rid of the Honda, I also dumped the tranny I had rebuilt, because I had done all the clutches and beefed up the valve body, but it was in pieces so hard to sell the thing. And if you're asking, I have no desire to rebuild a CVT. Besides, as I understand it, Nissan claims it can't be rebuilt satisfactorily by anybody else but the factory :rolleyes5:.

My car is a 2016 and isn't it supposed to have the 3rd generation CVT??? You'd think they would have fixed the problems by now. Right now it has 800+ miles. But I do plan to make an appointment to have it checked out.

Actually I was living in Japan for a couple of years, that is why I bought a Note, because I drove a couple as rental cars. The ones in Japan are solid cars with very good build quality. They are quiet, and if you don't watch the speedometer, you are cruising at 100 KPH in no time at all. Unfortunately, that is not the case with the U.S. model, as I found out it's made in Mexico. I have not heard of the tranny problems in Japan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
<Besides, as I understand it, Nissan claims it can't be rebuilt satisfactorily by anybody else but the factory .>

Yeah, dealer techs here are not allowed to open up/repair (discouraged). They have certain tests to perform. A dedicated call center # to call. Then get permission to replace (or order the replacement).

<You'd think they would have fixed the problems by now. Right now it has 800+ miles. But I do plan to make an appointment to have it checked out.>

Yes, some have failed as early 800 miles.

<U.S. model, as I found out it's made in Mexico. I have not heard of the tranny problems in Japan. >

That's good to hear about the Japan models.

<One well known Honda repair shop in town told me even the new Hondas have tranny problems>

Taking note.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
So, on the Nissan Leaf forum I frequent, I had made mention of the Versa CVT issue, and this guy was talking about his battery replacement on his Leaf.. This is what he said:
"Off topic, but:
My dealer allowed me to take pictures of the replacement battery pack for my 2012 Leaf. It was stored among dozens of black tote bins - all looking the same. I asked "what are all these" - the answer - failed CVT transmissions! You might want to check on any "class actions" with these transmissions."

So, dozens of CVT transmissions piled up at a Nissan dealership to send back to HQ. Sounds pretty endemic!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
<... dozens of CVT transmissions piled up at a Nissan dealership to send back to HQ. Sounds pretty endemic ...>

Yes, it is.

Replacement CVTs and failed CVTs stacked at the dealers, across the models.

Prospective new owners would be wise to "take that walk" at the dealers - beforehand, and then leave, or get a MT.

It's easy to go see for themselves.

It's quite a sight.

Next time you're at the dealer, go check "your" stacks.

Oh, and they're not going back to HQ, though. HQ is in Franklin, TN. Multi-story building with solar charging stations outside for a few Leafs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Well I took the car in for a service check yesterday and the Nissan dealer ran a couple of diagnostic checks. They told me there is a service bulletin out (could not find it by Googling) about the CVT noise - not sure this is in regard to the 3rd generation CVTs like in my 2016. Anyway, since I am not getting any service codes, they told me the noise is normal.

Over the weekend, I was in a hardware store parking lot and a man was asking me how I liked the car, as he had the exact same car. He just bought his Note last month, and told me about the whining noise. He said he took it in for a service check and they told him the same thing: the noise is normal.

I sure wish Nissan would double the warrantee to 7 years and 100,000 miles like they did with the pre-2010 cars. Having to sell off the car at the present 60,000 warrantee threshold is not getting much use out of the car. I can imagine a situation past 60,000 miles when the tranny fails, and you pay $4,000 out-of-pocket to have it repaired. Depending on the year, you might only get $8k for the car selling it used, and subtract the $4K you paid to fix the tranny and you only end up with $4K.

BTW, the service rep at Nissan told me all you hear is the tranny problems with Nissans, but Hondas have the same problem (as I mentioned earlier). At least it is possible to rebuild the constant mesh trannies in the Hondas yourself if you have the tools, proclivity, and patience for rebuilding automatic transmissions. Better get a bunch of gear pullers though. The CVTs are such tiny things, I don't see why Nissan says it can't be done better by a non-pro with dream tools (like digital precision measuring instruments) and perhaps aftermarket kits by Sonnax to address design flaws. I mean on the Honda tranny I rebuilt, I installed a Sonnax valve body kit to improve durability and address shortcomings with the tranny. I also installed Alto Red clutch discs (mainly because the Raybestos ones must have been counterfeit and wouldn't give me the proper clearances). I also did some minor deburring and stress relieving on the case. Again, I have experience building and blueprinting race motors and I used to port my own cylinder heads, and my philosophy is you gotta do it yourself to do it right. With the pros, time is money and they have to crank out repairs to maximize profits, which means they don't always torque every bolt to specs, and they use cheap tranny rebuild kits.

It looks like at this point, Toyotas are your best bet for avoiding tranny problems, except the Yaris, the equivalent of the Versa Note, is such an expensive car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I did a quick Google and there is one video on rebuilding a Nissan CVT however at 12-13' long, can't be very involved. I was not able to view it at work. But apparently you can buy CVT rebuild kits but they are rather expensive (up to $400), considering not a lot of parts are involved compared to other automatic trannies, due to the simple design of the CVT. Another problem is that parts (like the metal belts) must be obtained from the dealer, which drive costs up. And look here, Sonnax does make valve body components to address problems with this tranny:

http://d2q1ebiag300ih.cloudfront.net/uploads/valve_body_layout/vbl_file/13/JatNis-JF011E-VBL_Interactive.pdf?v=1458057917

There are also a couple of threads on the web of guys who have rebuilt their own CVTs. Problem is there are no established specialty tools available yet so one must jury rig spring compressors to work, which is always a PITA.

If I plan on keeping the car, I might do what I did with the Honda and buy a core out of a wreck, and play around rebuilding it. It's best to buy a core out of a wreck which was totaled (like serious front end damage), to ensure the engine/tranny was in running condition. Buying an already fried CVT will cost too much to rebuild due to the exhorbitant replacement parts from Nissan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Versa Point of Origin

<Besides, as I understand it, Nissan claims it can't be rebuilt satisfactorily by anybody else but the factory .>

Yeah, dealer techs here are not allowed to open up/repair (discouraged). They have certain tests to perform. A dedicated call center # to call. Then get permission to replace (or order the replacement).

<You'd think they would have fixed the problems by now. Right now it has 800+ miles. But I do plan to make an appointment to have it checked out.>

Yes, some have failed as early 800 miles.

<U.S. model, as I found out it's made in Mexico. I have not heard of the tranny problems in Japan. >

That's good to hear about the Japan models.

<One well known Honda repair shop in town told me even the new Hondas have tranny problems>

Taking note.
Here is some country of manufacture information. It looks like the Versa was, as of July 2014 when this article was written, built in Japan, so there is CVT hope for Versa owners:

Where Are the Different Nissan Models Built?
The highest performance models Nissan currently sells include the GTR and 370Z. Both of these models are manufactured at Nissan's Tochigi facility where highly skilled technicians capable of hand building such masterpieces as the VQ38DETT GTR engine are located. Production of the smaller and more entry level models such as the Versa, Cube and even the higher performance 350Z coupe are handled at the Oppama manufacturing facility. To round out manufacturing on the Japanese front, Nissan's Kyushu facility handles production of the Rogue and Murano crossover SUV model lines.

Nissan North America's Smyrna and Canton facilities are tasked with the bulk of production of Nissan's passenger sedans and SUV models. These models include everything from the Altima and Maxima sedans, to the remainder of Nissan's Truck and SUV lines which include the Titan, Frontier, Armada and Xterra. In addition to these, the Nissan Quest mini-van is also manufactured in the Canton Mississippi plant. The manufacturing location of Sentra models is unique in that it is manufactured in Aguas Calientes, Mexico, the only North American product manufacturing plant not located in Japan or America.

While the current Nissan product line is rich with variety, over half of those destined for the North American market are built right here in the United States, with manufacturing almost evenly split between the Tennessee and Mississippi locations. Given current sales figures, if you drive a new Nissan, chances are your car was like built right here in the heart of America.
:smile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I've got a 16 Note with CVT. Currently has 42,000 on it......it will be gone when it hits about 58,000. I might add that so far I haven't had any of the issues that people talk about here..........but I'm sure not taking any chances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Anyone have trouble with dealer holding up there end of the Lifetime Powertrain Warranty? I just bought 2015 Versa SV. Has 31,000 miles and the same whine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
<Besides, as I understand it, Nissan claims it can't be rebuilt satisfactorily by anybody else but the factory .>

Yeah, dealer techs here are not allowed to open up/repair (discouraged). They have certain tests to perform. A dedicated call center # to call. Then get permission to replace (or order the replacement).

<You'd think they would have fixed the problems by now. Right now it has 800+ miles. But I do plan to make an appointment to have it checked out.>

Yes, some have failed as early 800 miles.

<U.S. model, as I found out it's made in Mexico. I have not heard of the tranny problems in Japan. >

That's good to hear about the Japan models.

<One well known Honda repair shop in town told me even the new Hondas have tranny problems>

Taking note.
My 2012 versa sedan cvt went bad at just under 17000 miles. Brought it into the dealer 2 days before my power train warranty would have expired. The check engine light was on, and the dealer did the diagnostics and said that the main control valve in the tranny was bad and needed to be repaired. They called Nissan to authorize the repair, and they were directed to replace the entire transmission with another unit rather than try to repair the old one. I am in the market for a new vehicle, but I will not even consider any car with a CVT tranny, which leaves most of Nissans vehicles off my list!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
"Prospective new owners would be wise to "take that walk" at the dealers - beforehand, and then leave, or get a MT."

"I am in the market for a new vehicle, but I will not even consider any car with a CVT tranny, which leaves most of Nissans vehicles off my list!!!!!"

Right now, you can only get a manual transmission with the Versa Sedan, Sentra and 370z plus whatever is in the trucks. The Kicks and the Note don't even offer a MT on their lowest tier models, neither do the Altima or Maxima - thus removing them from any prospective future buying consideration for me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Honda gives you the option for cvt or manual on their Fit and Civics. I had a cvt late model insight I abused and it held up to 104 thousand miles before I sold it.

I think the toyota yaris and corolla can be had with either.

Mitsubishi has the mirage, but its a 3 cylinder dog to drive with stick or auto.

Yeah, Id avoid a car from nissan with a cvt. I liked the rogue I drove and their cvts seems to hold up better.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top