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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,

My parents have a 2014 Versa SV Sedan with CVT. I just changed the CVT fluid (which is a ridiculous procedure) and I noticed when my Dad was pulling the car out of the garage, there was a whining noise that sounds like pump cavitation/aeration. I'm a fluid power technician and I'm very familiar with the sounds of cavitation/aeration. I suspect this noise has always been present and is caused by something else, but I've never noticed it before.

My concern is that I somehow screwed up the fluid change and the CVT fluid level is too low, thus causing the transmission pump to aerate (intake gas as well as/instead of fluid). I followed the procedure in the service manual, and so I think the fluid level is correct, but I can't be sure and now I'm anxious about it. Can anyone provide any insights that might help?

Also, can anyone tell me how much fluid should drain from the transmission when the overfill tube is removed? The manual quotes a capacity of 6.9L, but I suspect only a fraction of that is in the pan, the rest would be in the cooler lines and valve manifold block. I suspect it's somewhere around 3L based on the service procedure.

I think I'm going to try the procedure again, despite the cost, just to set my mind at ease.
 

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When I changed the fluid/2 filters in my '16 about a month ago I caught the fluid that drained in an oil pan then measured the amount that came out so I'd know exactly how much to add back. Mine drained 3 3/4 quarts with only the front end elevated. According to Nissan the transmission fluid is supposed to be checked at a certain temperature and the car level when checking the fluid level. At that temperature drain until the fluid is at a trickle from the standpipe in the transmission pan. I didn't do all that, I figured replacing with the same amount of fluid that drained got it back to factory fill level. Whether you know it or not there's a plug in a dipstick tube on top of the transmission up near the coolant overflow bottle that can be removed to fill the transmission from the top. The plug locks in place but can be removed with a screwdriver. After you filled the transmission did you run it through each of the gears for about 5-10 second intervals to get the fluid flowing through the transmission before driving it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I changed the fluid/2 filters in my '16 about a month ago I caught the fluid that drained in an oil pan then measured the amount that came out so I'd know exactly how much to add back. Mine drained 3 3/4 quarts with only the front end elevated. According to Nissan the transmission fluid is supposed to be checked at a certain temperature and the car level when checking the fluid level. At that temperature drain until the fluid is at a trickle from the standpipe in the transmission pan. I didn't do all that, I figured replacing with the same amount of fluid that drained got it back to factory fill level. Whether you know it or not there's a plug in a dipstick tube on top of the transmission up near the coolant overflow bottle that can be removed to fill the transmission from the top. The plug locks in place but can be removed with a screwdriver. After you filled the transmission did you run it through each of the gears for about 5-10 second intervals to get the fluid flowing through the transmission before driving it?
I had the front on ramps and the rear on jack stands, so it was fairly level. I drained then filled with 3L and did the shift/flush procedure, then drained again and filled. This is actually supposed to be done twice (in order to flush the valve manifold block and cooler circuit), but I was concerned I didn't have enough fluid to do it. If the transmission takes 6.9L and you only change 3.5L, it's still almost half old fluid. I attempted to find the plugged dipstick tube, but only succeeded in locating the breather. It's so cramped, I couldn't see the damned thing. I even tried taking the battery tray out, but got frustrated and decided to pump from below. I'd love a picture of exactly where the dipstick tube is, as well as the filter locations. The service manual doesn't say anything about filters in the CVT section.
 

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I had the front on ramps and the rear on jack stands, so it was fairly level. I drained then filled with 3L and did the shift/flush procedure, then drained again and filled. This is actually supposed to be done twice (in order to flush the valve manifold block and cooler circuit), but I was concerned I didn't have enough fluid to do it. If the transmission takes 6.9L and you only change 3.5L, it's still almost half old fluid. I attempted to find the plugged dipstick tube, but only succeeded in locating the breather. It's so cramped, I couldn't see the damned thing. I even tried taking the battery tray out, but got frustrated and decided to pump from below. I'd love a picture of exactly where the dipstick tube is, as well as the filter locations. The service manual doesn't say anything about filters in the CVT section.
My camera is broken and I don't know how to post pictures onto the web site but on my '16 if you remove the bolt holding the coolant overflow bottle (10mm hex head if I recall corrrectly) in place and move the overflow bottle out of the way (no need to remove the hoses) you'll see the cap. There's no dipstick just a locking cap on the dipstick tube. The way I removed the cap on mine was from underneath the car I was able to put a screwdriver in the lock area then hit it with a hammer to get it to release. Getting the locking cap off was the hardest part of the whole job for me. When I put the cap back on I didn't lock it back down since there's an o-ring that seals the cap in place that won't allow it to come out without an outside force. If you have a long snout funnel there's no need to remove the battery tray. There are videos on you tube of people doing the procedure that may show the cap location. The cap is way forward of the vent and down lower. There are two filters one is the standard in pan filter like auto transmissions have had for years and the other is a cartridge filter for the valve body. The cartridge filter is on the side of the transmission up very near the front of the transmission. The best way to get to it is take the inner fender loose and look for a small round canister held in place by one bolt, remove that bolt and turn the canister about 45* counter clockwise to release the housing. At the time I did mine Rock Auto had both filters but weren't listed under the Versa listing. Go to universal parts/tools and search Raybestos Powertrain part numbers 515783 and 515784 they were both under $7. each. The size of the o-ring for the exteral housing is 46mm ID x49 mm OD. A package of 25 oil/temperature resisitant Buna can be bought from McMaster-Carr for $8.01 part number 9262K433 or a package of 5 oil/heat resistant Viton for $5.76 part number 1295N182. You can also buy a single from Nissan for about $4.50 part number 31526-3JX3A.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My camera is broken and I don't know how to post pictures onto the web site but on my '16 if you remove the bolt holding the coolant overflow bottle (10mm hex head if I recall corrrectly) in place and move the overflow bottle out of the way (no need to remove the hoses) you'll see the cap. There's no dipstick just a locking cap on the dipstick tube. The way I removed the cap on mine was from underneath the car I was able to put a screwdriver in the lock area then hit it with a hammer to get it to release. Getting the locking cap off was the hardest part of the whole job for me. When I put the cap back on I didn't lock it back down since there's an o-ring that seals the cap in place that won't allow it to come out without an outside force. If you have a long snout funnel there's no need to remove the battery tray. There are videos on you tube of people doing the procedure that may show the cap location. The cap is way forward of the vent and down lower. There are two filters one is the standard in pan filter like auto transmissions have had for years and the other is a cartridge filter for the valve body. The cartridge filter is on the side of the transmission up very near the front of the transmission. The best way to get to it is take the inner fender loose and look for a small round canister held in place by one bolt, remove that bolt and turn the canister about 45* counter clockwise to release the housing. At the time I did mine Rock Auto had both filters but weren't listed under the Versa listing. Go to universal parts/tools and search Raybestos Powertrain part numbers 515783 and 515784 they were both under $7. each. The size of the o-ring for the exteral housing is 46mm ID x49 mm OD. A package of 25 oil/temperature resisitant Buna can be bought from McMaster-Carr for $8.01 part number 9262K433 or a package of 5 oil/heat resistant Viton for $5.76 part number 1295N182. You can also buy a single from Nissan for about $4.50 part number 31526-3JX3A.
Excellent, thanks for the info, that'll make things much easier. I found the dipstick tube and cap after looking at a picture of the transmission online. I'm going to do the process again, but take more time and replace the filter and pan gasket.
 

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Excellent, thanks for the info, that'll make things much easier. I found the dipstick tube and cap after looking at a picture of the transmission online. I'm going to do the process again, but take more time and replace the filter and pan gasket.
I had an extra pan gasket and extra o-ring for the external filter housing but when I got mine apart both of the originals still looked to be in excellent condition so I didn't replace either of them this time around. It's likely you can check the condition of both and make the decision then whether they need to be replaced or not, but I'd have them on hand just in case. Neither of the filters from Rock Auto come with a gasket or o-ring, but I've seen some pan filters on Amazon that came with the gasket at a decent price. You can download the factory service manual here which will show the torque sequence for the pan bolts and give you all the other torque specifications. How To Use NICOclub Factory Service Manuals
 
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