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Check your OM. Per the owner's manual for my 2015: "DRIVETRAIN Drive shafts, final drive housing, and all internal parts, propeller shafts, universal joints, bearings, seals and gaskets."

I realize we're talking the rear axle, but I don't see why that would be different. Problem with dealers is, if you call to ask,, they probably won't give you an answer until they look at the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hum I can get a bearing at local auto parts store right now for 38 bucks,. At autozone I dont know if this is one of those cheapy bearings or not. it s a National Wheel Bearing/Hub Assembly 511042. BUT if I can get it done its a no brainier. Had to be Sunday when it was warm enough to look at it.
 

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This is just me, but if I had a press or the gear gathered to remove and replace the bearing, I'd do it myself it was under ~$50 or so.
 

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Wow! Could you feel it when you rolled that rear wheel once you got it up in the air?

My issue at the moment would be I don't believe I've got anything to drive a bearing of that size out/in of the drum.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No once I get the wheel off the ground I CANT feel any play in wheel and it feels fairly smooth. The grinding noise is gone but that's because I believe some rust got into drum. BUT NOW I know my bearing is toast. I put the drum back on tightened nut to 177 foot pounds and will see Monday if dealer will cover under warranty. The BIG question is will they look at my video on my phone and agree its a bad bearing without TRYING to charge me money to say WE HAVE to diagnose it for 200 bucks. If so I will just do it myself. I have a old ball joint press. (big C-clamp) that I think I can press new bearing it without using large socket to drive in with hammer.


Wow! Could you feel it when you rolled that rear wheel once you got it up in the air?

My issue at the moment would be I don't believe I've got anything to drive a bearing of that size out/in of the drum.
Wow! Could you feel it when you rolled that rear wheel once you got it up in the air?

My issue at the moment would be I don't believe I've got anything to drive a bearing of that size out/in of the drum.

Wow! Could you feel it when you rolled that rear wheel once you got it up in the air?

My issue at the moment would be I don't believe I've got anything to drive a bearing of that size out/in of the drum.
 

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Depends on the service adviser or service manager and what he/she passes on to the tech. In terms of tools needed to R/R the bearing, all else fails, grab a big gear puller from Harbor Freight and/or one of their seal/bearing puller kits That's probably the route I'll go when the time comes.

FWIW, I'll have to do front pads and rotors on our 2015 before the end of February 2020 when the state inspection is due on this car. They're pretty well shot at ~47k miles. I highly doubt they'll even look at the rear brakes given how they're designed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Depends on the service adviser or service manager and what he/she passes on to the tech. In terms of tools needed to R/R the bearing, all else fails, grab a big gear puller from Harbor Freight and/or one of their seal/bearing puller kits That's probably the route I'll go when the time comes.

FWIW, I'll have to do front pads and rotors on our 2015 before the end of February 2020 when the state inspection is due on this car. They're pretty well shot at ~47k miles. I highly doubt they'll even look at the rear brakes given how they're designed.
No they never look at the back on this design. I did the fronts this past August. I got my rotors and pads from Rock auto. Way less money and I got the coated rotors living in Buffalo NY area. Local cost for coated rotors was over a 100 a rotor at local parts stores. RAYBESTOS coated were in the 25 bucks online. it crazy how much prices vary. local Pep Boys wants 100 dollars a bearing (rear bearing) for same brand bearing at Autozone has for 38 and online Rock Auto 19, all the same exact bearing .
 

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That bearing may be fine depending on what type is used there. Oldschool trapped wheel bearings are still used and can flop around like that in brand new parts. A cartridge type bearing using side seals may even still be good with movement of close to that much. The parts in those cases are not tight until assembled with the center axle in place to tighten them up. Missing that of course the bearings can flop around loose to look like in the video.

If BOTH the bearing and hub come as one unit at that price you definitely have a cheap crap bearing being used there. A GOOD wheel bearing goes for about $50 by ITSELF, with no hub or other part used as an assembly. When I sold bearing alone as well as pressed in other parts you could not get the 'good' bearings except by themselves, the crap ones are what gets used on the value parts that include a hub or other part already prepressed together.

Why I always press the bearing myself, to get the good bearing for sure. I warranted out countless prepressed together parts, it was very clear those used the crap bearings in them, some didn't even get any grease, they were bone dry of it and came apart in a minute of driving.
 

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I got the coated rotors living in Buffalo NY area. Local cost for coated rotors was over a 100 a rotor at local parts stores.
Small world! I live just outside of East Aurora.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That bearing may be fine depending on what type is used there. Oldschool trapped wheel bearings are still used and can flop around like that in brand new parts. A cartridge type bearing using side seals may even still be good with movement of close to that much. The parts in those cases are not tight until assembled with the center axle in place to tighten them up. Missing that of course the bearings can flop around loose to look like in the video.

If BOTH the bearing and hub come as one unit at that price you definitely have a cheap crap bearing being used there. A GOOD wheel bearing goes for about $50 by ITSELF, with no hub or other part used as an assembly. When I sold bearing alone as well as pressed in other parts you could not get the 'good' bearings except by themselves, the crap ones are what gets used on the value parts that include a hub or other part already prepressed together.

Why I always press the bearing myself, to get the good bearing for sure. I warranted out countless prepressed together parts, it was very clear those used the crap bearings in them, some didn't even get any grease, they were bone dry of it and came apart in a minute of driving.
Are you saying that much play in the bearing in video I shot is OK?? If so then I have nothing left to do.
In hear no noises from bearing BUT its kinda hard to tell as I now have on snow tires which make quite a bit of road noise on there own.

The bearing prices I quoted are just for the bearing NOT the drum too. Timken bearing is 18.95 at Rock Auto. Rock also sells the National brand at same price. The National Brand bearing is what both local Autozone Parts store Advanced Auto and Pep boys all have BUT radically different prices.$38.95 $40.95 and $116.99.
 

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Looking back at your video clip on it, it does look like some radial play on that inner race which would be bad. Axial play of the inner race should be normal. Thing is, you say the wheel rolls smooth and quiet when everything is buttoned up and no noise when your'e driving aside from the snow tire rumble. I'd leave it and see how it goes with the regular tires in the spring.

I hear you on snow tire noise. I've got firestone winterforces on ours and they're noisy.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Looking back at your video clip on it, it does look like some radial play on that inner race which would be bad. Axial play of the inner race should be normal. Thing is, you say the wheel rolls smooth and quiet when everything is buttoned up and no noise when your'e driving aside from the snow tire rumble. I'd leave it and see how it goes with the regular tires in the spring.

I hear you on snow tire noise. I've got firestone winterforces on ours and they're noisy.
Well the play in bearing made me to worried to I ordered new drums and Timken wheel bearings. Both sides . Plus from a online Nissan dealer new snap rings that hold bearing in and new axle nuts that service manual I found online say use once. Plus new studs as the drum doesn't come with wheel studs . One thing I didn't see on any youtube video is the ABS sensor ring you have to remove from old drum and install on new drum, the service manual says use only NEW sensor ring which I also can only find at dealer for 80 bucks and that's the cheaper online price. I will reuse mine. hope it doesn't break when removing or installing on new drums..

So Nissan really screwed the pooch with this design. I will stay far far away from Nissan ever again. If you did the rear brakes according to manual it would cost a fortune. I bet the dealer doesn't even replace the sensor ring nor do they replace the axle nut. I called all local dealers and NONE stock the axle nut yet I asked if they ever did rear bearings or rear brakes on Versa's and he says oh yea for sure yet no axle nuts stocked.

For now iam not real worried about it but next warm spell I will change out the drums with new bearings. Then I should be able to forget about rear bearings until I get rid of this car.

Ridiculously poor design and because of it costly rear brakes. That is with online parts cost. Locally is NUTS.

Drums and bearings $108.37 Rock Auto. another 34.40 for new wheel studs snap rings and axle nuts. So $142.77 just for parts to replace drums with bearings, This is BEST online pricing. local quadruple that if not more. My last car 2008 Honda Fit had 80K miles no rear brake or bearing issues.
 

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'So Nissan really screwed the pooch with this design.'

Most cars use that type of design now, not just Nissan. Been that way for 25+ years. Where ya been?

You try to reuse the ABS ring but if it pressfits the fitting back tight may be a problem. The outer nut can often be reused up to 3-4 times too. I don't care what the service manual says. If it pulls up tight at torquing it back to the big number it's fine. Get a new one if it seems to give way, the threads are pulling. Reuse snap rings if they are OK too.

I have never changed both sides of wheel bearings ever either, commonly one side can fail and the other go years, maybe even the life of car with no changing. In your case there I would be changing and pressing bearing myself and bearing the only part bought to have car running again for years. BTDT.

The crap bearing alone goes for anywhere around $25, the good ones go for around $50 unless you get the cheats who sell you the cheap crap one online for $50 and I've seen it. For one thing NO bearing that is a chain store branded box is usually the good one, pull the part out of the box, it may surprise you, sometimes you get a good one inside a crap $25 box. The chains rebox bearings all day long, I used to do it. I lucked out a while back to find Centrics off Rock Auto at $35 that when opened had the good SKF bearing in box.

45+ years of never paying ever for car repair of ANY type and on a long stream of them, how you save thousands in costs.
 

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'Are you saying that much play in the bearing in video I shot is OK??'

Yes, it could easily be. The bearing types used now are not held tight at the balls or rollers until mounted to the center stub they go to, that is what pilots all parts into the correct orientation and then the bearing gets tight as used.

Went back and viewed the vid again, still with same conclusion. Only rolling all around at assembled can tell you if bad and maybe not even then. Making noise in use indicates bad, you can commonly roll tire in air fast to get the same noise. If too loud bearing is bad.
 

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Forgot about the exciter ring, or what ever Nissan calls them. Looks like it slides over the OD of the hub inside the drum.

If you've got no noise or symptoms happening at this point. I'd do nothing. Hang on to the parts until you need them.

I've owned Hondas in the past and had decent luck with them, but they've got some pretty crummy designed things as well. Had to replace a bunch of weird crap on our 2007 Honda Odyssey very early in it's life. Regardless, I would never buy a Nissan expecting it to be a Honda, Toyota, etc. That's why they depreciate like a mofo and are half the cost of a used Honda, etc. My kinda car. LOL
 

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Mine as well, you might as well get your profit off the top because EVERY marque now has its' black sheep model that is a money pit even brand new.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
'So Nissan really screwed the pooch with this design.'

Most cars use that type of design now, not just Nissan. Been that way for 25+ years. Where ya been?

You try to reuse the ABS ring but if it pressfits the fitting back tight may be a problem. The outer nut can often be reused up to 3-4 times too. I don't care what the service manual says. If it pulls up tight at torquing it back to the big number it's fine. Get a new one if it seems to give way, the threads are pulling. Reuse snap rings if they are OK too.

I have never changed both sides of wheel bearings ever either, commonly one side can fail and the other go years, maybe even the life of car with no changing. In your case there I would be changing and pressing bearing myself and bearing the only part bought to have car running again for years. BTDT.

The crap bearing alone goes for anywhere around $25, the good ones go for around $50 unless you get the cheats who sell you the cheap crap one online for $50 and I've seen it. For one thing NO bearing that is a chain store branded box is usually the good one, pull the part out of the box, it may surprise you, sometimes you get a good one inside a crap $25 box. The chains rebox bearings all day long, I used to do it. I lucked out a while back to find Centrics off Rock Auto at $35 that when opened had the good SKF bearing in box.

45+ years of never paying ever for car repair of ANY type and on a long stream of them, how you save thousands in costs.
I disagree about the design. MOST cars now have disk in the rear but the ones still with drum DO NOT have the bearing pressed into the drum itself. Sealed bearings have been around a long time just not pressed into the drum. The drum can be pulled right off most cars for easy inspection and replacement. My 2008 Honda Fit was this way and the Honda is STILL this way. My 2001 CRV was that way. . This is the first i have ever seen like this,. Old K-cars had bearing part of drum but they were the old style tapered rollers that needed repacking with grease similar to the old style front wheel bearings. . This design is most likely the cause of all the wheel bearing problems in the first place. Making the drum much more pricey plus making checking the rear brakes a PITA.

So NO CARS are NOT like this. Only Nissan is like this.

As far as bearings The TIMKEN brand bearing is NOT some cheap China bearing. its made in the USA and has a good history. it $18.54 at Rock Auto.

My background I worked as a mechanic back in the 80's and early 90's last 4 years at Chevy Dealership. granted not recently. .
 

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'So NO CARS are NOT like this. Only Nissan is like this.'

I have 3 Fords back to '95 and all 3 are like that, pressed in cartridge bearing in drums. As well besides working on many different makes while Dad owned the garage I sold auto parts and plenty other makes use that type bearing. Both my Focus of different years and design use it, the Contours before did as well as Taurus, Tempo, and others. The reason why is one of parts inventory contraction and what they use engineers for now rather than to improve the cars. They look to unitize parts that commonly used to be available separately, the idea being to condense multiple parts into larger more complicated subassemblies. Drums already pressed with cartridge bearings are one of those actions now to make them more money at the parts counters, it has nothing to do with reliability at all. When GM continued to by and large use the oldschool bearing type they were walking away from millions in added parts sales, no surprise there. Look who had to declare bankruptcy.

Timken bearings for the biggest part are NOT made in the US (go to the website and prepare to be dismayed) and haven't been for years. They have factories in 35 countries all over the world including in CHINA. They now make a low price line like the others were forced to to compete with $25 bearings. You often cannot go by the box and even if the part is US made it can be one of the bad ones and how they are so cheap. They do not pay as much attention to the heat treats and the accuracy to the 10,000th drops off. You go for the high price line instead and what I sold to people when I was in parts and they broke the $25 dollar one almost immediately. National makes a two tier bearing line too. SKF, Fafnir, NTN, Bowers BCA can make a good bearing that lasts for years. If you knew how many Timken low end bearings I've warranted that failed in a week you would rethink that. Look at the part warranty, the low line is usually one year or 6 months and the upper line is higher than that. They change them all the time though, low may now be 90 days instead.

We rip the Chinese bearings all day long but what we don't grasp is that China has the same issue as us, they have businesses that can produce quality that will work on aerospace stuff with no issues and then there is the lower value crap, the problem is one of finding the good Chinese (or other, many bearings come from southeast Asia) part, the price often tells you that. If you want US buy it, I for one want the bearing that lasts for years instead.

If you are thinking the same bearing gets sold for either $25 or $50 depending on the sellers' cajones I can assure you you are dead wrong there. I wouldn't even bother to use an $18 bearing. Seen most of them fail and don't care what name is on them.
 
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