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Had my 16 Note SV with 56,000 miles, CVT: in to the Nissan dealer for an oil change (got $15 for oil change coupon in mail). They did one of those multipoint checks while doing oil change. Only thing they found wrong is they said I needed a new battery.

I know it's just a come on.....the car starts and runs fine.

But:::::
How long are you folks getting out of the original battery?
 

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My father in law traded in their 1998 Nissan Maxima in 2007 with the factory battery in it yet. He never even thought about it because it always just did it's thing. Given how small they size car batteries today, you'd probably be lucky to get 5yrs out of one. It seems extremely hot climates are tougher on automotive batteries than colder climates.
 

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When I was in parts the OEM battery life of all brands was close to the same, or about 4 years max..............you can always have one of the ones that goes a whopping distance just because of the randomness of it all, battery science is never exact. I've had a 3 year Walmart battery go to 11 years before and right now have one that is now at 8+. Batteries that sit a lot in undriven cars last longer if you keep them charged up on time, they shake less, it is the vibration of car moving that shakes the sulfation loose to then drop to bottom of cells to build up to short them out over time. If you keep the battery disconnected while it sits then it does not cycle down to run down over and over nearly as fast, that extends the life too.

To OP, the battery check can show a battery that is getting low even though it seems to perform fine. The loadtest number drops during battery life and that number is the true tale of what kind of shape the battery is in. The later Fords will begin to do a needle sweep like Nissan does normally, it shows a battery as being low and the sweep showing up means you have maybe 2 more months left before your first fail to start. If one is tuned in, (I do it all the time) one can tell when a battery is close to the end by simply picking up on how the starter solenoid reacts, the slight differences often tell you when it is getting weaker but you have to have an ear for it and the familiarity of how the car usually sounds at cranking.
 

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Batteries just aren't as good as they used to be. When the factory battery went bad on my mom's Grand Marquis I went and bought what was supposed to be a top of the line battery. If I recall correctly I had to trade for 3 different batteries before I finally got a good one. I was also having to buy a new battery nearly every year for her riding mower. This past spring I decided to cut the ends off the battery cables and replace them with terminals for a car battery and put a car battery in it. I was able to buy a 2 year free replacement, 5 year pro rated battery at Rural King for about $55 and I'd been paying $20-25 for lawn and garden batteries and having to replace them yearly. I didn't have any problem starting that 15.5HP motor this year.
 

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For my lawn equipment batteries, I just keep a $6 harbor freight tools battery tender/trickle charger plugged into them over the winter. My riding mower battery is from 2009. If you let them sit all winter, you're lucky to get a few years out of them.
 

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For my lawn equipment batteries, I just keep a $6 harbor freight tools battery tender/trickle charger plugged into them over the winter. My riding mower battery is from 2009. If you let them sit all winter, you're lucky to get a few years out of them.
I've got some of the trickle chargers from Harbor Freight too but, I still had lots of issues with lawn mower batteries only lasting a year or slightly over. Best lawn mower battery I can recall ever having was an Interstate that lasted 7-8 years but the last time I priced an Interstate I could buy a full size car battery for just a few dollars more. The reviews for the Interstate batteries were kind of hit or miss too and sure didn't want to pay $50 for one and it only last a year.
 

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When I sold lawn batteries it was understood they pretty much cycle out every year, most customers accept that and the industry itself is pointed in that direction. I made mine go longer too and then quit using them at all, simply jumping the mower off with a car battery. I use it as well on my cordless Makita drill since the batteries got old and refused to charge up.

The vast majority of car batteries will go bad at 3-4 years regardless of the brand or quality or life level. The 7-8 year ones are the worst about not making full time there and Motorcraft were the only ones that even came close to hitting warranty life, most others die in 5-6 years and often sooner. Why I never buy more than a 3 year battery, most of those will go to 4 years and even the 2 year ones commonly go 3 years. All of that learned from selling them OTC for years.
 

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A guy that got over a million miles out of a Mercedes had a tip to keep your electrical system in great shape. He said to replace the battery and generally all fluids at the recommended schedule
That way to don't strain the system any more than is necessary. It's not always the cheapest route. It depends on how long you want to keep it. I'm 65 and my 2018 Versa has 6,700 on it and I want to drive it to the grave!
 
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