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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read an earlier thread about the quality of paint used by Nissan for the V's, and that they are suspect for increased spot rusting on the body (especially for areas that have climates supportive of rust).

My white SL Sedan has minor surface rust spots at various locations on the body and on the trunk.

Anyone have any suggestions on what I can use to get rid of them, without sanding, priming and repainting?

Evaporust won't work as it needs to soak and I don't think it is safe for auto paints.

I checked the Exterior Forum Boards but could not find if there is any previous info to help. Thanks.
 

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show us where it's rusting please. That way we can all keep an eye out on our cars.

Only way to get rid of rust is to remove it. So sanding, priming and painting are your only options. Short of cutting and welding. There is a chemical people use with good results called POR15. I myself have never used it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Ok, here are some pics. The car is dirty as we are having wacky weather the last couple of days with high winds, snow squalls and precip. I tried to clear a couple of the areas to see the reddish rust spots. Some are very small (like pin head size). Other, like over the trunk deck lid middle are a bit bigger.

First pic is on the drivers door, about half way down. Second and third are on the trunk, over the chrome strip above the license plate and to the right of the Nissan emblem about 8 inches or so.

Any advise would be appreciated.
 

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I would think that a stone chip left untouched might chip, but not sure how the trunk would get chipped. Was the car ever rust proofed by the previous owner? That might have helped prevent the rust around the trunk trim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don't know if it was rust proofed, does not look like it. However, that would be the undercarriage and wheel wells, inside bottom of doors and deck lids, etc.

Would not cover surface spots such as these. Stone chips probably or slight parking lot dings maybe, not sure, at least for the door areas. The trunk, not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Could be rail dust.
Is it on plastic bits as well like the bumpers?
Yes I believe that is what it is. I never heard of this before but after looking it up based in your response Shift, that is exactly what it looks like.

Lots of info on the web on how to deal with this and come some better weather, I will get a clay bar, clay lubricant and iron x and attempt to clean these spots out.
 

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those spots have sent me for a loop as well.
I was trying to figure out how a 2010 car could be rusting all over.

not sure about the clay bar ... i've heard it can do more harm than good but don't have any personal experience. a detail shop would probably give it a light wet sand, polish and sealant.
 

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Using a clay bar on a vehicle is super easy as long as you make sure the vehicle is properly lubricated with the quick detail spray that is included in the kit.

I prefer the Meguairs clay bar kit myself. Like a polish, you really shouldn't need to do it more than once a year. Plus, you'll be amazed at how smooth your paint is.
 

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@Versa12 .... do you know if that will work for rail dust?

From what i've heard, clay will rub off the exposed tip but leave behind the rest of the metal in the paint allowing the rust to return.
 

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Using a clay bar on a vehicle is super easy as long as you make sure the vehicle is properly lubricated with the quick detail spray that is included in the kit.

I prefer the Meguairs clay bar kit myself. Like a polish, you really shouldn't need to do it more than once a year. Plus, you'll be amazed at how smooth your paint is.
I clay bar my car every spring before her annual wax treatment.
It won't ruin your paint, unless you don't use it properly.
 

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@Versa12 .... do you know if that will work for rail dust?

From what i've heard, clay will rub off the exposed tip but leave behind the rest of the metal in the paint allowing the rust to return.
No idea.

If it does remove the rail dust then all you have to do is buy a small touch up bottle of clear coat and fill in those spots.
 

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I read an earlier thread about the quality of paint used by Nissan for the V's, and that they are suspect for increased spot rusting on the body (especially for areas that have climates supportive of rust).

My white SL Sedan has minor surface rust spots at various locations on the body and on the trunk.

Anyone have any suggestions on what I can use to get rid of them, without sanding, priming and repainting?

Evaporust won't work as it needs to soak and I don't think it is safe for auto paints.

I checked the Exterior Forum Boards but could not find if there is any previous info to help. Thanks.
just an off topic question:

Do you keep your car under a car garage?
 

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Could be rail dust.
Is it on plastic bits as well like the bumpers?
Not sure if this is 100% correct but it is food for thought
From the web


A question was recently presented to me by a reader regarding “rail dust.”

First of all, “rail dust” if removed properly does not come back.

Rail dust is exactly that, when cars are transported by train (rail) from the factory to a city, the metal wheels of the train cars running on metal rails create small particles of metal that fly into the air and land on the horizontal surfaces of the car.

They are hot and will adhere to the paint. Then when they get wet from rain; snow or just dew they rust and create tiny little rust spots which are quite visible on white, yellow, beige or light colored cars.

The proper way to remove them is to soak towels in “rail dust remover” and lay the towels on the offended areas of the vehicle. Follow the manufacturer’s recommended dwell time to allow the chemical to dissolve the rust spots and loosen the particles of metal.

When this is accomplished rinse off the car with high pressure water to insure all particles are gone.

Then pre-spray the car with a mild alkaline cleaner to neutralize the acidic rail dust remover. If you do not do this, acid will remain on the paint finish and when it gets wet it will be active and could etch into the finish.

Then rinse off the alkaline chemical and follow that with a thorough hand car wash using a mild carwash shampoo and water.

To be safe, a coat of wax or paint sealant should be applied to the paint for protection.

Never use clay to remove rail dust because all that does is break off the tip of the metal particle, leaving a part of the metal still on/in the paint and when it rusts the spots will come back. If a paint finish offended with rail dust is properly treated chemically, then that should solve the problem.

You certainly do not want to repaint a vehicle unless you are absolutely certain there is no rail dust residue on the car. Of course, a competent paint shop would insure this to be the case before repainting.

If a detail shop, auto dealer or body shop attempted to remove the rail dust and it comes back, it is a good assumption that they do not know know what they are doing, or implemented the incorrect process.

rail rust
Beth
November 13, 2012
I have been reading MANY definitions of rail dust online. Several have said that rail dust is NOT only produced by trains. It's also been said it can be produced by exposure to anything from sandblasting to acid rain, from your disk brakes, or even from industrial areas. I have a 2010 white Challenger that has rail dust all over but is very fine and hard to see. My car was not transported by rail as it was made in Brampton, Ontario. Chrysler has been informed of this. The took pictures and sent it to Chrysler Canada to see if they would cover it under warranty. Do you know if this is usually something covered by warranty? Thx, Beth

detailer
Tom
March 26, 2013
No Beth, I don't think it will be covered by warranty, because its not the fault of the manufacture. I've been in the detailing business for 25 years,I deal with rail dust almost daily. It comes from driving on wet roads contaminated with these metal particals. I use a product called rail dust remover, its an acid based cleaner. I spay it on the vehicle after I've washed it and leave it on for about 20 minutes to a half hour and then just re-wash the vehicle. It all come off. Then the vehicle should be waxed after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks VinnieV for the info. I too did a bit more looking around the web and spoke to a few friends who are very into cars, expensive ones. They all do the claying and waxing/sealant every year or so and swear by it.

There is a reputable local auto detail specialty shop that has clayed hundreds of cars and trucks so for $150, I think I will take it to them to clean/clay/sealant my car and have it done once a year or so. It's recommended every 9-12 months or so, however if you wax your car as well, this can prolong the sealant so I think that is what I will do and monitor it.

I do so much driving (about 25,000KM per year) all over Southern Ontario as well as to mid-North Ontario (Sudbury), Ottawa, Montreal and even to Chicago, that I want to try to make my car paint last as long as I can and for $150 a year, not too bad. It's already a 4-year old car that I just got 2 months ago off a lease return and I am hoping to put another 100,000KM on it over 4 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I clay bar my car every spring before her annual wax treatment.
It won't ruin your paint, unless you don't use it properly.
For my first claying, I will get it done professionally.

However, since iLuv is a pro at this already, maybe she can arrange a "claying party" and we can all meet up and learn how it is done from her one day! :smilewinkgrin:
 

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Thanks VinnieV for the info. I too did a bit more looking around the web and spoke to a few friends who are very into cars, expensive ones. They all do the claying and waxing/sealant every year or so and swear by it.

There is a reputable local auto detail specialty shop that has clayed hundreds of cars and trucks so for $150, I think I will take it to them to clean/clay/sealant my car and have it done once a year or so. It's recommended every 9-12 months or so, however if you wax your car as well, this can prolong the sealant so I think that is what I will do and monitor it.

I do so much driving (about 25,000KM per year) all over Southern Ontario as well as to mid-North Ontario (Sudbury), Ottawa, Montreal and even to Chicago, that I want to try to make my car paint last as long as I can and for $150 a year, not too bad. It's already a 4-year old car that I just got 2 months ago off a lease return and I am hoping to put another 100,000KM on it over 4 years.
You know I never knew about "rail dust" and I have noticed this on my Versa hood last year. Might be also rail dust type material from driving highway with all the salt solutions, sand and stone dust that they apply to the roads in New England. I will take your advise and do a clay process with the rail dust remover solutions as well and then a Meguiar's cleaner and wax.
 

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@Kennethbokor similar situation here. 2010 versa, just finishing the lease and hoping to put a lot more km on it before it gives out.

What maintenance did you do at the end of your lease to help prolong your versa's life?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
@Kennethbokor similar situation here. 2010 versa, just finishing the lease and hoping to put a lot more km on it before it gives out.

What maintenance did you do at the end of your lease to help prolong your versa's life?
Hi, actually I purchased the car used as it was a returned lease car from Nissan Canada. The previous owner had the car for 4-years, with an extended warranty but returned it to Nissan Canada in December. I purchased it from a local dealer (who got the car from Nissan Canada via Auction) in early February. So the car already had 114,00KM on it when I got it.

Since is was a new purchase, the dealer I got it from performed safety and emissions testing/inspections so they could sell it, as per provincial laws. They had to do a couple of things to make it roadworthy.

After I purchased it, I've done quite a lot including lube/oil/filter, new tires, tint, sunroof visor, leaky oil pan gasket, rear O2 sensor replacement and turned rotors/brake service.

The car is running and driving great (knock on wood!). I plan to do the claying and sealant soon as my next step, followed by a CVT oil change later on in the spring.

Relative further to your original question, I am guessing the leasing company will check the car over for you to make sure everything is ok and if not, either fix or let you know what needs to be done. Since you are now purchasing the car outright from the leasing company and you are in Canada, I think a safety and e-test are required (not sure of you Province) so that would need to get done by the leasing company I think. After you get the car, you may want to do an oil/filter, however since you have already had the car, you already know the maintenance history and can time your next oil change accordingly.

Hope I answered your question. If not, ask away.
 
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