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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, this is an 1.8 engine and the six-speed transmission (kinda obvious it's a manual, right :) The "feel" of the pedal is solid, not at all spongy. Recently, the pedal stuck down. It's only done it once, and pulling it up by hand restored normal operation. This car has been crashed (front end) and clearly both driven, and home-repaired, badly, which might perhaps factor into this.

My first thought was dirty hydraulic fluid, and I plan to bleed all the hydraulics, clutch and brake alike. If things continue to misbehave, I'll have to look at more serious options. I envisage looking at the return spring (is there one?) and whether it't the right one and strong enough, and whether the front-end crash might have bent something such that the return spring might perhaps go "over-center" when the pedal is all the way down. Then I suppose we're onto the cylinders, which will be less fun.

Anyway, any ideas are welcome, but my first question is about the bleeding procedure. I read the workshop manual, and the Haynes manual, and am really not finding them very clear (insufficient diagrams, and insufficiently detailed ones!) I did find this youtube of someone bleeding a Juke. The parts look kinda similar to what I think I've found on the Versa. Can someone confirm if this bleed procedure and the bits and bobs, is a reasonably close approximation of what I need to do with the Versa?
??

Thanks for any input!
 

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Well, I went for it, and it seems that the video is at least somewhat representative. I'd add these observations to help clarify and hope they make life easier for someone else.

  1. The clip is a nasty wire thing, and must be pushed down very firmly to release the valve. Take care, since it seems much of the clutch slave cylinder and it's supporting parts are plastic, to support the back (lower side) of the valve while you push on the wire, I think the whole thing might break if you are ham fisted.
  2. The wire is thin and digs viciously into my "office boy" fingers. I found that I could barely press it hard enough unless I used a piece of wood to spread the load on my thumb.
  3. Even with the help of wood, the clip is hard to push far enough to release the valve. Don't force the valve, but know that it slides pretty easily when the clip is released
  4. If you pull too hard on the valve (away from the gearbox) the thing comes too far away and introduces air back into the system all over again. Take care only to let it come 5mm / 0.2" away. More than that and you'll get a bunch of bubbles, and you know what that means.
  5. The video shows them randomly pumping the pedal. That's wrong, the proper order (like any bleeding operation) is open bleed valve, press pedal, hold pedal and close valve, then release pedal, give master a moment to refill, then repeat the cycle.
I don't know for sure if this has fixed my problem, but the fluid that came out was essentially black, so it clearly needed it. Of course, it's also quite likely that that black is rotting rubber parts, in which case I'll have a bigger problem. Anyway, for now, the clutch is behaving (it only jammed once anyway) so I'll keep my fingers crossed.
 

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Well, I went for it, and it seems that the video is at least somewhat representative. I'd add these observations to help clarify and hope they make life easier for someone else.

  1. The clip is a nasty wire thing, and must be pushed down very firmly to release the valve. Take care, since it seems much of the clutch slave cylinder and it's supporting parts are plastic, to support the back (lower side) of the valve while you push on the wire, I think the whole thing might break if you are ham fisted.
  2. The wire is thin and digs viciously into my "office boy" fingers. I found that I could barely press it hard enough unless I used a piece of wood to spread the load on my thumb.
  3. Even with the help of wood, the clip is hard to push far enough to release the valve. Don't force the valve, but know that it slides pretty easily when the clip is released
  4. If you pull too hard on the valve (away from the gearbox) the thing comes too far away and introduces air back into the system all over again. Take care only to let it come 5mm / 0.2" away. More than that and you'll get a bunch of bubbles, and you know what that means.
  5. The video shows them randomly pumping the pedal. That's wrong, the proper order (like any bleeding operation) is open bleed valve, press pedal, hold pedal and close valve, then release pedal, give master a moment to refill, then repeat the cycle.
I don't know for sure if this has fixed my problem, but the fluid that came out was essentially black, so it clearly needed it. Of course, it's also quite likely that that black is rotting rubber parts, in which case I'll have a bigger problem. Anyway, for now, the clutch is behaving (it only jammed once anyway) so I'll keep my fingers crossed.
I’m having a hell of a time trying to bench bleed the master, do you remember how you did it
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I’m having a hell of a time trying to bench bleed the master, do you remember how you did it
I'm afraid I never bled the master. I discovered the slave cylinder needed replacing, and that was altogether too big a job, and I scrapped the car. Pity, I'd put a stupid amount of work into it, but I was sold a lemon and should have known better :(

Good luck with it.
 
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