Nissan Versa Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to under stand how to do preventive maintenance on a Nissan CVT. What I am trying to understand is

1. What is the most common cause of Nissan CVT failure? Is it too much load (like towing a heavy trailer)? Is it due to driving habit like constantly accelerating causing wear? Is it a lack of fluid change? Is it driving through dirty conditions? Is it due to some unfortunate manufacturering defect that cannot be prevented?

2. In the manual, the maintenance just state check the CVT fluid. I have no idea what that means. The manual states that "the CVT fluid deterioration data is more than 210000". This seems to indicate some sort of equipment that Nissan has to examine the quality of the fluid. I do not know if this info can be read through the OBD2 port, or if some specialized equipment is needed. When I checked with the dealer, they were not exactly helpful and didn't know about the reader.

There is no issue with the car now, but by the time something goes wrong, it would be too late, so I am trying to plan ahead. On a Subaru, one common cause of CVT failure is to follow the manual recommendation that the CVT will last for the lifetime of the car, so changing it often will prevent that. What about Nissans? If they have some sort of deterioration meter, should we just have Nissan check it and change it when it's near 210000 (whatever that number means...).

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Did you try to contact Nissan customer service and ask this question? It does not necessary mean they will be useful, but just to cover all bases...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
In the post, I did indicate I contacted the dealer, but they said they don't know anything about the reader. They recommended changing the fluid every 30K, which wouldn't hurt but is costly and is probably a benefit to them.

Is there a main Nissan number?

paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Nissan tech uses Consult-II to read the CVT Fluid Deterioration counter. If it is higher than 210,000, change the CVT fluid.

There is an Android App to use with ELM327 to get CVT info similar to the Nissan Consult-II scanner.
CVTz50 - CVT diagnostics with ELM327

This is the thread which I started about this app. I have the correct ELM327 module. But I have not purchased the app yet.
https://www.nissanversaforums.com/general-technical-electrical/42108-android-app-cvtz50-–-cvt-diagnostics-elm327.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Couple of things come to mind:

if you have another dealer available I'd try them.....they should all know about the fluid reader

Somewhere in the manual (not sure which year) it says to change the fluid at 60,000 miles.

I am always amazed at how little the folks at the dealerships seem to know about the cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
In the post, I did indicate I contacted the dealer, but they said they don't know anything about the reader. They recommended changing the fluid every 30K, which wouldn't hurt but is costly and is probably a benefit to them.

Is there a main Nissan number?

paul
I saw that you already contacted the dealership. I meant to contact the Nissan corporation customer support. The web site is https://www.nissanusa.com/contact-us.html

From that web site you can send them a message, and they also list a few numbers to call:

NISSAN CONSUMER AFFAIRS
P.O. Box 685003
Franklin, TN 37068-5003

Phone: (800) NISSAN-1 (or 800-647-7261)

NISSAN OWNER SERVICES
NissanConnect Customer Support

Phone: 1-855-426-6628

When you get in touch with Nissan, let them know at once that you already contacted your dealership and are still not satisfied. Be persistent dealing with them. If you find a dead end at Nissan corporation, try to contact your Nissan zone representative (or whatever they call this position). This person could be very helpful.

Also, as other user suggested, try to contact another Nissan dealership. They could be different as day and night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, I will contact the main corporate office. Actually, this dealer was where the car was purchased, but we ended up using a different dealer nearby because we had issues. Unfortunately, that dealer closed so we are back to the original dealer. Most repairs are not done by the dealer.

Thanks for the tip on the app, I actually have a Fixd that I wasn't using any more since they updated their app to require a $60/year subscription. The item turns out to have a ELM327 v1.5 interface that the cvtz50 app wants, but I haven't had a chance to test it.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
Don't expect much from the dealer unless you are paying for it. They will play stupid until you cave in to let them do the work.

If truly concerned change the fluid at 30K, the normal number is 60 but that may be too late on ones driven hard enough.

Quite simply, the transmissions are designed to barely make full life at best and some won't, Nissan does not care. Different heat treating on the ball bearings and some modding like on chains and other parts and the transmissions could go much longer on average, but that takes money away from the CEO (now in jail for financial irregularities). They went to CVT to begin with as they cost maybe half what standard ATX designs do.

Use the app in post #4 ............it can measure the deterioration number and also reset it when needed at fluid changes, all it is is a number showing how overheated the fluid has gotten.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So essentially, the problem is that CVT heats up, causing deterioration and changing the deterioration number, when it reach the number 210000, it should be replaced. Changing it basically keeps the fluid fresh and less likely to damage cvt?


I looked at a site nissanproblems.com which list quite a number of transmission issue on the 2014 Versa? Anyone on this site experience issues?

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
I am trying to under stand how to do preventive maintenance on a Nissan CVT. What I am trying to understand is

1. What is the most common cause of Nissan CVT failure? Is it too much load (like towing a heavy trailer)? Is it due to driving habit like constantly accelerating causing wear? Is it a lack of fluid change? Is it driving through dirty conditions? Is it due to some unfortunate manufacturering defect that cannot be prevented?

2. In the manual, the maintenance just state check the CVT fluid. I have no idea what that means. The manual states that "the CVT fluid deterioration data is more than 210000". This seems to indicate some sort of equipment that Nissan has to examine the quality of the fluid. I do not know if this info can be read through the OBD2 port, or if some specialized equipment is needed. When I checked with the dealer, they were not exactly helpful and didn't know about the reader.

There is no issue with the car now, but by the time something goes wrong, it would be too late, so I am trying to plan ahead. On a Subaru, one common cause of CVT failure is to follow the manual recommendation that the CVT will last for the lifetime of the car, so changing it often will prevent that. What about Nissans? If they have some sort of deterioration meter, should we just have Nissan check it and change it when it's near 210000 (whatever that number means...).

Paul
The only mention of changing out the CVT fluid is listed under under the "Premium Maintenance" schedule, and it recommends that it be changed at 60,000 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Sadly, I contacted Nissan USA and they said that they have no way of answering technical questions and we will just have to go to the dealers for all technical answers. I suppose I could call several dealer and see what their answers will be but seriously? This means I have no way of getting definitive answers since I can't really trust the dealer when their recommendation deviates from the manual.

Getting back to the subject of when to change, is the deterioration rating a good indicator of when to change? The reason is that the car isn't driven all that much and is not likely to hit 30K any time soon even though it's 5 years old. I need to know if the CVT fluid needs changing. Based on the dealer's recommendation, it should have been changed 2 years ago (3 year/30K) or if I followed the premium schedule in the manual next year at 6 yr/60,000 miles. Changing it isn't cheap, so I would rather avoid it if it's not actually going to prevent anything.

I could call around and find a dealer who could "test" the cvt fluid.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
The fluid is definitely going to get particulate in it as the belt and other parts wear. That is pretty much a function of the number or miles driven (or abuse). It's a crap shoot as to when this becomes a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
You WERE told about the dealers and higher up...............The OEMs figured out long ago that too much info back to the customers killed their dealer work throughputs. Why you don't get free service manuals with every new car sale. They view after the sale maintenance as theirs only and why CVT gets maintained the way it does now. A dumber customer is better and the way they like it.

Fluid at some point needs changing even with time only, it slowly develops acids in it from the exposure to metal parts and humidity. Where low temperature sludge comes from. Transmissions are not as bad about that as engines are though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I have 2007 Versa hatchback with CVT with 251,000 Km (156,000 Miles). I changed my CVT oil twice at 100,000 and 200,000 km. I have not experience the limp mode which people are talking about. I may be the lucky one without issue with my CVT. I had problem with the front springs, steering wheel clockspring and lower control arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I had a moment of clarity while talking with the developer of CvtZ50 app, the android app that can pair up with a ELM327 to display cvt info. He pointed out that the deterioration value should not be used to judge when to change CVT fluid, but more of a way to gauge in a relative scale how much deterioration you get from heat. He suggest the best way to judge would be to visually inspect it. Unfortunately, I don't think you can just pull out a dip stick and check it.

I am now thinking of just replacing the fluid after this year, which would mean the car is 6 years old and nowhere near 30K, but perhaps it would be a good idea to maintain it due to possible contamination. We could change earlier if the dealer can show that the fluid is a bad color.

paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
You can indeed look at fluid color as a temperature exposure device. The fluid gets both darker and dirty looking. There is not so much dye to tell actual burning like old school red fluids had, the fluid actually changed color on those but if you apply the same color change direction to CVT fluid that should work too. Take my Altima, the fluid is very faint bluish or blue-green but beginning to get dirty like gray or black added to it. The color shows best wiped on a clean paper towel to show it against the white.

You can likely add a dipstick where none was at and what I did on that car.

Looking at fluid is not strictly a dealer ability, any fool can do it. Why I use no dealers at all and now for 45+ years. They are most commonly NOT your friend there regardless of what they say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
My dealer told me on my 2018 Versa the transmission is sealed and no way to change it. Both the salesman and service manager told me that. The service manager said there isn't even a drain plug on them. I wish there was a good video out there showing how to do it along with flushing the torque converter out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
My dealer told me on my 2018 Versa the transmission is sealed and no way to change it. Both the salesman and service manager told me that. The service manager said there isn't even a drain plug on them. I wish there was a good video out there showing how to do it along with flushing the torque converter out.
There are a number of Youtube videos that show how to do it at home, but this is one of those issues that I would let the dealer handle. The information below gives you some information:


Service Tips
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
They haven't put drain plugs on most ATX pans for like 50 years now, you can't let that stop you.

Regardless, changing ALL of the fluid on one of these can be a challenge.

The dealer there was a liar, no other way to put it. There is no such thing as a sealed transmission and never has been.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top