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Is anyone aware of a video online or process document for the Versa CVT fluid replacement? I'm not planning on doing this any time soon, just would be nice to see how complicated it is.

Also I read an article on another forum taking about the dealer "testing the CVT" fluid...does anyone know anything about that? What is the test all about, if it exists?

Is there is a not so obvious reason to have the dealer do this work when the time comes around?

Just wondering if the process is documented online.

So...if anyone on forum has changed their own CVT fluid, can they comment on process?

We bought a '12 Versa and everything so far so good. A lot to be said for the mileage.

I doubt changing the CVT fluid can be all that complicated when the time comes. Haven't gone looking under the hood to see if any specialty tools (example torx type fitting) needed to open CVT for example, and am not planning on it.

Just wondering if anyone has changed the CVT fluid themselves.

Buying it allowed us the downtime on the other car to do a lot of heavy overdue maintenance. I've swapped out the intake gasket on our GM engine several times, so no way it can be anyway as near complicated as that job...so complication is not an issue.

Thanks for your replies!
 

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I've heard the tranny control module checks the status of the fluid and rates it on a scale. The shops use an expensive diagnostics scanner that connects to the OBD2 port, but you might be able to get it from a Bluetooth scanner and software on a laptop or smartphone.

You can drain and fill the fluid yourself, but you won't be able to do as good of a job as the dealer, since they have tools to completely flush the old fluid. A DIY job will always have some mixing of the new and old fluid since some of it remains in the housing.
 

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You can drain and fill the fluid yourself, but you won't be able to do as good of a job as the dealer, since they have tools to completely flush the old fluid. A DIY job will always have some mixing of the new and old fluid since some of it remains in the housing.
Really? Not what I was told last week when bringing in my Versa into the stealer for a very cheap oil change. My Versa has 43k miles and was advised to get the CVT fluid changed. I asked how much and was told $180. I then asked if that included a flush and filter change. Was told there is no filter, they do not flush and the service is just a drain and fill. $180 for that? Negative.

I looked through my trusty maintenance PDF files for the drain and fill technique and learned something. I also looked through the forum posts here and determined I will use OEM trans fluid. Even buying at full retail price it will be MUCH cheaper than paying $180.

Anyway, the procedure is to drive the car for 10-15 mins to warm things up. Remove the outlet hose from the trans cooler. While the vehicle is running at idle, let the old fluid drain out while new fluid is being put in. Wait for new fluid to start draining out.

I'm not sure how quickly how the fluid drains out, but this sounds like a 2-person job.

Thoughts?
 

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two persons job

Really? Not what I was told last week when bringing in my Versa into the stealer for a very cheap oil change. My Versa has 43k miles and was advised to get the CVT fluid changed. I asked how much and was told $180. I then asked if that included a flush and filter change. Was told there is no filter, they do not flush and the service is just a drain and fill. $180 for that? Negative.

I looked through my trusty maintenance PDF files for the drain and fill technique and learned something. I also looked through the forum posts here and determined I will use OEM trans fluid. Even buying at full retail price it will be MUCH cheaper than paying $180.

Anyway, the procedure is to drive the car for 10-15 mins to warm things up. Remove the outlet hose from the trans cooler. While the vehicle is running at idle, let the old fluid drain out while new fluid is being put in. Wait for new fluid to start draining out.

I'm not sure how quickly how the fluid drains out, but this sounds like a 2-person job.

Thoughts?
It is a two persons job and a messy job at that. Will be pricy as well, since you will need several gallons of the juice...
have not done it on the Verta yet, but have on other vehicles.
 

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I don't know anything about the Versas CVT but I am well versed in Honda auto trannies.

In my Honda, it is NEVER recomended to flush the transmission because like the Versa, it does not have a filter. Instead, it has a permanent screen (That I assume ther Versa would have too). Flushing it causes the mesh screen to become clogged and therefore cause the transmission to fail. On my Honda, I would simply do drain and refills using only genuine Honda fluid. I simply removed the drain bolt, clean off the magnet, drained the fluid, added 3 qts, drove 20 miles and repeated one or two times more.

If you remove a hose and add fluid while the old stuff comes out be warned it comes out very quickly and you should have another person to assist you.

On a side not, I would not recommend going to any shop other then the dealer to have the service performed. I worked at Firestone Complete Autocare and we only had 3 different "universal" transmission fluids. We did have problems with shift quality and even a transmission going out after such a service. Genuine tranny fluid might seem expensive but it is well worth the extra money to prevent thousands to replace a transmission.

It sucks to hear the service is $180....I have a lifetime warranty on my CVT and motor but I have to follow the service intervals.
 

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Excellent advice Versa12

Very sound advice from Versa12.

1. Don't flush it.
2. Drain and fill using only the proper Nissan fluid.

What is still missing from this thread is specific information on the drain and fill procedure for the CVT. Drain and fill sounds simple. However, it would be good to hear from someone who has done this. Some transmissions are considered "sealed" if you ask the manufacturer and it is not always easy to find a drain plug or obvious fill plug. Is the Nissan CVT this way? Using the engine to pump out the fluid while you try to pour the correct amount back in at the proper rate has an element of risk to a $4k transmission that I am unwilling to try.

I have nothing to offer regarding this as my 07 is the four-speed auto with an obvious drain and fill plug. Super easy and quick. I do a drain and fill once a year (approx every 10k miles). $32 for the Nissan fluid.

My only information to offer is to measure exactly how much fluid you drain out and put that much back in. Especially if there is no way to check the fluid level. I am not sure on the CVT.
 

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Hi I can add my two cents to this thread as I watched the mechanic at the local dealership do the job today. I got chatty with him asking questions and I also asked to see the color of my fluid befor changing. It was very black and it is supposed to be a nice green. With 129,000km's on it, I knew I was overdue. Recommended change frequency is 100,000km's or so.

Basically, the guy put the car up on the hoist and unscrewed a drain plug from the bottom of the cvt. Let it drain completely, cleaned the bottom and put back the plug careful not to over tighten. There was no flushing involved. Then put the car back down and thru the cvt dipstick tube, refilled the cvt with I think 4 or so liters of Nissan cvt fluid. Then he started the car and ran thru each gear selector a couple of times. Then put back cvt dipstick, checked level and the did a road test.

I do feel a bit of a difference as it would sometimes hesitate slightly on mild acceleration after only a couple of minutes of running. I just put that to the cvt fluid warming up. Seems to be gone now but I will continue to monitor.

I am not sure if he reprogrammed anything or not to let the computer know the fluid was changed.

Hope this info is helpful. Cost wise, the fluid is $30 per liter here in Ontario and then an hour or so labour. It's about $350-$400 tax in for the job. A big pill to swallow but I figure once every 4-5 years its worth it.
 

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The 2012 is way different in terms of a CVT fluid change. I have a copy of the Factory Service Manual for it and I can't say for 100% sure how to do it as I haven't attempted it yet, but it seems simple.
1) You remove the plug and overflow tube from the drain and let it drain.
2) Install a "charging kit" to push approximately 3L amount of fluid back into the transmission
3) Remove charging kit and quickly reinstall the drain plug only
4) Start engine and run through each gear for 5 seconds then stop engine
5) Remove drain plug and drain fluid once more
6) Reinstall the overflow tube and the charging kit and add approximately 3L of fluid again
7) Remove charging kit and reinstall the plug
8) Start the vehicle and run through each gear. Put vehicle back into park.
9) Check the fluid level by removing the plug (while idling in park) and watch to see if any fluid drains from the overflow. If it doesn't, add more fluid, if it does, wait till it slows to a drip.

Remember to use Nissan NS-2 CVT Fluid only. Good luck finding a charging kit (PN: KV311039S0).

 

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The 2012 is way different in terms of a CVT fluid change. I have a copy of the Factory Service Manual for it and I can't say for 100% sure how to do it as I haven't attempted it yet, but it seems simple.
1) You remove the plug and overflow tube from the drain and let it drain.
2) Install a "charging kit" to push approximately 3L amount of fluid back into the transmission
3) Remove charging kit and quickly reinstall the drain plug only
4) Start engine and run through each gear for 5 seconds then stop engine
5) Remove drain plug and drain fluid once more
6) Reinstall the overflow tube and the charging kit and add approximately 3L of fluid again
7) Remove charging kit and reinstall the plug
8) Start the vehicle and run through each gear. Put vehicle back into park.
9) Check the fluid level by removing the plug (while idling in park) and watch to see if any fluid drains from the overflow. If it doesn't, add more fluid, if it does, wait till it slows to a drip.

Remember to use Nissan NS-2 CVT Fluid only. Good luck finding a charging kit (PN: KV311039S0).

Good post. Like I said in an earlier post, it does not seem like too much effort to change cvt pre2012 fluid yourself. Important to emphasize you must use Nissan fluid only. Not another auto-type fluid. It's the fluid that is expensive. It is green when clean and will turn dark black over use time. In Canada, Nissan recommends changing every 100,000kms or depending on state of the fluid. I had mine done and it came out black.

So if the dealer is telling you to change it at 40-some odd thousand miles, ask them to show you a sample of the fluid and explain why. That seems too soon. Green is good, once any hint of green is gone, then time to change.

For my case, having it done once every 3-4 years is worth spending $400 ($100 per year if I break it down). Just means 20 less grande lattes per year.
 

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Good post. Like I said in an earlier post, it does not seem like too much effort to change cvt pre2012 fluid yourself. Important to emphasize you must use Nissan fluid only. Not another auto-type fluid. It's the fluid that is expensive. It is green when clean and will turn dark black over use time. In Canada, Nissan recommends changing every 100,000kms or depending on state of the fluid. I had mine done and it came out black.

So if the dealer is telling you to change it at 40-some odd thousand miles, ask them to show you a sample of the fluid and explain why. That seems too soon. Green is good, once any hint of green is gone, then time to change.

For my case, having it done once every 3-4 years is worth spending $400 ($100 per year if I break it down). Just means 20 less grande lattes per year.
I'm headed to the states next Saturday to pick up 8L of Genuine Nissan NS2 CVT fluid that I got off amazon for $127 tax and shipping included. Should be enough to do the recommended drain-fill-drain-fill. I have 85,000km of highway miles on my 2012 sedan already so we'll see how black it is after that.

I should actually do a DIY Guide if it works out alright... we'll see how it goes without a dipstick tube to refill from.
 

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Btw, I am not sure in 2012 and up Versas, but in my 2008 w/CVT, there is a dipstick to check the CVT fluid and you also refill the fluid via this dipstick tube. The dipstick is a little tricky to get off as it has a tab lock you need to push in with a small screwdriver to get it off.

So it's my understanding that this is where you refill the fluid thru.
 

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Well, I successfully completed the CVT fluid change on a 2012 1.6L Sedan. I just hit the 100,000km mark so I decided to give it a try this afternoon. If you buy the right equipment, its fairly simple.

For those wondering, the fluid needs to be "injected" from the bottom-up. There is no charge pipe/dipstick tube on the new HR16DE engines with the CVT. There is a rubber inspection tube at the top of the engine which can be pulled off completely but serves no purpose for the fluid change.

What I did was purchase a 1/2'' female fuel line fitting, a 1/2'' male-male tapered adapter (a regular adapter will rip the soft aluminum threads inside of the pan), an oil suction syringe used to push the fluid into the pan, 4' of 1/2'' clear tubing, and a few quarts of Nissan NS2 CVT fluid. Also, the overflow pipe inside of the drain takes a hex bit and its in there pretty dam tight so be prepared for that.

What I did first was park the car outside in the cold for a few hours along with the new transmission fluid I was about to put into the car to roughly equalize the temperatures. Instead of buying a Consult-2 reader and measuring the temperature of the transmission fluid, I applied a simpler approach of whatever amount comes out, goes back in.

I jacked the car up, released the plug and drained as much as I could into a calibrated jug until it came to a drip. I removed the overflow pipe from the drain and that removed a couple quarts of fluid.

I re-installed the overflow pipe after it was done draining, attached the male-male adapter to the pan, the female fuel adapter to the bottom of that one, and attached the 4' of clear tube to the fuel line adapter.

I primed the empty hose with CVT fluid, then installed the exact same amount of fluid that drained out, removed the fittings from the pan, and re-installed the drain plug with a new gasket (same copper washer used for the oil drain plug).

All seems fine and with parts the fluid change cost me about $40 and an hour of my time.
 

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I had the dealer replace the CVT fluid in my '08 about five months ago at around 60K (miles). It's one of the years covered under the CVT warranty extension, so I figured it was worth the extra cost to have the dealer do the job so it would be on record in case I needed warranty work on the transmission.
 

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Great post and instructions! I too have a 2012 Versa sedan and want to do the tranny fluid change myself. I've read the TM and it seems reasonable. My bigger question is, How do you go about resetting the “CONFORM CVTF DETERIORTN” value in the computer? Has anybody successfully done this with a Bluetooth ODBDII aftermarket scanner? According to the TM you need to erase the value once you change the fluid, which makes sense. If you don't erase the old value, what happens? Will the CEL come on eventually?
 

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Great post and instructions! I too have a 2012 Versa sedan and want to do the tranny fluid change myself. I've read the TM and it seems reasonable. My bigger question is, How do you go about resetting the “CONFORM CVTF DETERIORTN” value in the computer? Has anybody successfully done this with a Bluetooth ODBDII aftermarket scanner? According to the TM you need to erase the value once you change the fluid, which makes sense. If you don't erase the old value, what happens? Will the CEL come on eventually?
It wouldn't be through the ODB2 scanner, but through a Nissan Consult-2 unit. However, no lights will come up if you don't change the value as it's a "lifetime" fluid.


Also, I now have 180,000km on my 2012 and the transmission is still functioning the same as it was when I purchased the car. Great bang for your buck car.
 

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Just an update for 2017, my 2015 Note is at 52K miles and makes a funny whirring noise going down the road and a slight klunk when pulling away from a stop. Called the dealer and they quoted me $229 :|
But it sounds like a huge PITA/mess so I will pay them to do it.
 

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It's easy enough to see what they are doing on the '12. You don't need a 'recharge kit' if what I see there is accurate, a simple handpump or syringe will work if you make it up to seal at the level tube good enough. I myself would be aiming more for very dark green fluid rather than black, black says there is enough metal dust in the fluid to already be wearing trans parts more. Maybe 60-75K miles? I often ignore what the OEM says, often the number given there is too high and how they get more trans work. You learn to use the fluid to a max but not enough to damage the trans.
 

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No Mess

I purchased a fumoto f103s short nipple valve with 12mm-1.25 threads and a hose kit for s type valves with 3/8 short nipples. My 2017 Nissan versa sedan s plus does have the fill hole at the top but it is not easy to get to. Under the battery. Hard to see initially.
 
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