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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi i got a set of aftermarket wheels and im not sure what i need to torque them to. Some websites say 75-85 foot lbs while others say 93. Also, is it the same for the stock wheels too? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I torque mine to 85ft/lbs with a Craftsman Microtork 1/2in drive. Also depends on type of torque wrench and leverage

Hope you're not using the same lugs as the stock wheels on your aftermarket. It would be ideal to get some fresh lugs, and make sure you don't lube the wheel studs before torquing the lugs (it may read different ft/lbs; e.g. WD-40)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick response! I have the Mastercraft micro-adjusting with 1/2" drive so i believe they are fairly similar. I have new chrome security lugs and my old lugs are tucked away in my garage with my winter wheels. I usually went to the shop where i bought my wheels to get them torqued but im tired of driving across town for a five minute tune-up so i decided to do it myself. Thanks again for the reply and ill go with 85!
 

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Also depends on type of torque wrench and leverage........
and make sure you don't lube the wheel studs before torquing the lugs (it may read different ft/lbs; e.g. WD-40)
Torque is torque. A properly calibrated torque wrench should give you the same value as another give or take a couple of percentage. Leverage simply allows less effort at the end of the wrench.

I know that common advice is to not lubricate the studs, but here in the rust belt, I always apply a small amount of anti-seaze. Lubrication actually keeps the friction of the threads from "using up" the torque required to properly tighten against the wheel. It also allows you to remove them some day.

The fear is that the lube will allow the lug nuts to "back off". If you keep the lube away from the seating surface between the lug and the wheel, you won't have a problem. Re-torque them after a couple of weeks of driving to be sure.
 

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Torque is torque. A properly calibrated torque wrench should give you the same value as another give or take a couple of percentage. Leverage simply allows less effort at the end of the wrench.

I know that common advice is to not lubricate the studs, but here in the rust belt, I always apply a small amount of anti-seaze. Lubrication actually keeps the friction of the threads from "using up" the torque required to properly tighten against the wheel. It also allows you to remove them some day.

The fear is that the lube will allow the lug nuts to "back off". If you keep the lube away from the seating surface between the lug and the wheel, you won't have a problem. Re-torque them after a couple of weeks of driving to be sure.
+1:thumb2:
My mechanic told me he's not worried I will over-do it, but rather be sure to torque evenly with each lug. Then i resnug them after 50-100km.
 

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I torque my wheels to 80 with my torque wrench. Can't remember the name of it, but I got it from an auto parts supplier here in town, on sale for $60.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the great tips! I torqued them today and i believe that they were previously torqued to 85 by the shop that i bought my wheels. Ill probably stick with 85, it seems like the middle number.
 
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