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In the old days the dealers were smart enough and cared enough about driver safety (and dealer liability) to never allow towing on the smaller engines as it tears them up pretty quick if overloaded and if towing anything at all on a 2 liter or less you are pretty much overloaded and even worse with the modern OD trans ratios now used. The owner manuals used to always say never tow with a four cylinder. Fast forward to today and drivers with no clue and the dealers will tell you you can tow with a tricycle as it wears the engines out faster and sells more new cars that way.

Yours and do as you will but I used to replace the engines that were towed on at way less than 100K miles for a delivery company, them being slick--ssed worn out at that low miles.

Not talking about a one time light tow but if you do it on a regular basis you are asking for it. A 2.5 will probably be OK but nothing smaller.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
In the old days the dealers were smart enough and cared enough about driver safety (and dealer liability) to never allow towing on the smaller engines as it tears them up pretty quick if overloaded and if towing anything at all on a 2 liter or less you are pretty much overloaded and even worse with the modern OD trans ratios now used. The owner manuals used to always say never tow with a four cylinder. Fast forward to today and drivers with no clue and the dealers will tell you you can tow with a tricycle as it wears the engines out faster and sells more new cars that way.

Yours and do as you will but I used to replace the engines that were towed on at way less than 100K miles for a delivery company, them being slick--ssed worn out at that low miles.

Not talking about a one time light tow but if you do it on a regular basis you are asking for it. A 2.5 will probably be OK but nothing smaller.
I am not going to tow any trailers with it. I only need it to tow my 400lb motorcycle for 15 miles to a shop.
 

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You have a 'wet' clutch. So there is oil between the clutch plates. If you spin one side (either the clutch disks or pressure plate disks) by rotating the back wheel you will heat up the oil expand the clutch plates and at best burn (wear) them quite a bit, at worst they expand, make contact, and begin spinning the engine. Not sure about your bike but it probably has between 5 and 9 clutch plates. The distance between the plates is fractions of an inch so spinning one side will heat them very quickly.
 

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You have a 'wet' clutch. So there is oil between the clutch plates. If you spin one side (either the clutch disks or pressure plate disks) by rotating the back wheel you will heat up the oil expand the clutch plates and at best burn (wear) them quite a bit, at worst they expand, make contact, and begin spinning the engine. Not sure about your bike but it probably has between 5 and 9 clutch plates. The distance between the plates is fractions of an inch so spinning one side will heat them very quickly.
Will keeping a clutch handle squeezed (for example using cable zip ties) make it safe?
 

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A motorcycle clutch does not spin when the transmission is in neutral. I'm a motorcycle mechanic. The oil pump however does not pump oil to the transmission when the engine isn't running so eventually the gears and bearings get starved for oil. Removing the chain is necessary for long distance towing but I wouldn't bother for 5 miles.
 

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Really don't mean to start an argument but if you think about the mechanics of the drive system in a motorcycle.....the main shaft that the clutches ride on is driven when the rear wheel is turned. No the clutch plates should not turn but the pressure plates do and the viscosity of the oil tends to put some pressure on the clutch plates. Heat is generated which expands the parts and can cause the clutch disks and pressure plate disks to come in contact causing wear at a minimum or if they really heat up causing the engine to turn over.

https://www.google.com/search?q=motorcycle+clutch+picture&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=i00DhsaLy2uEKM%3A%2CF_uzrUxAlJd9gM%2C_&usg=AI4_-kSZnOh1kAV4sBffuNL9-cp1VvaUKQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiUgezL2JffAhVJIqwKHSj4DpIQ9QEwAHoECAQQBA#imgrc=i00DhsaLy2uEKM:
 

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No part of the clutch turns unless the engine is running or the rear wheel is turned when the transmission is in gear. Think about it. Can you push start a motorcycle in neutral?
 

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I would for 15 and been a bike mech for many years among other things. Even 5 might be risking parts depending on the design there.The issue not clutch as the discs are locked together with bike just sitting in N and clutch is all one unit then. It is the plain like brass bushings if anywhere in trans that will likely damage first, hardened ball and needle roller bearings last for a while with very scanty lube.

I'd likely tape the key in place to keep fork unlocked and tie down the clutch lever in case the freaky happened and something pitches from under car to strike shifter lever and knock trans into gear. Or, put it in neutral and remove the lever. You don't want it going into gear no way there.
 
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