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Discussion Starter #1
2016 Note. Any reason why dashboard low tire indicator would designate incorrect tire position of low tire?
RR was low, LR is designated for low tire pressure. This happened last time I had a low tire, on the rear of the car. Would valve stem caps have anything to do with it?
 

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2016 Note. Any reason why dashboard low tire indicator would designate incorrect tire position of low tire?
RR was low, LR is designated for low tire pressure. This happened last time I had a low tire, on the rear of the car. Would valve stem caps have anything to do with it?
I found that the tire pressure sensors can be touchy at times. I know when the outside temperature goes down, my sensors usually start to pop up on the dash. When that happens its time for me to get my trusty hand held tire pressure gauge out and check all the tires for the correct pressure, and adjust accordingly.
 

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Yes, and the up and down temperature swings here lately had me adjusting them every other week it seemed, normally only once a year when changes come.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your response. I didn't rotate the tire but possibly Enterprise did, from whom I purchased the Note. I'll attempt a reset, it cannot do any harm.
 

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When a vehicle is able to note which tire position is low on air, it generally needs a reset tool that tells what TPMS sensor is in what location on the vehicle. When a tech is resetting the sensors, he will punch in where the tire is on the vehicle for each sensor.

FWD vehicles should rotate tires as follows:
Front tires move straight to the rears.
Rear tires are crossed to the front.

It would make sense in your case because you tire still thinks its on the LR. Meaning it was then rotated to the RF, and is now on the RR.
 

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FWD vehicles should rotate tires as follows:
Front tires move straight to the rears.
Rear tires are crossed to the front.
According to owner's manual for 2017 Versa sedan, Front tires move straight to the rears, but Rear tires are NOT crossed to the front, but move straight to the front.

One reason for not crossing tires, when a spare is not involved in the rotation and only four drive tires are rotated, is when you cross tires, they rotate in a different direction, and that may contribute to a cord separation and tire failure, even for non-directional tires.
 

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According to owner's manual for 2017 Versa sedan, Front tires move straight to the rears, but Rear tires are NOT crossed to the front, but move straight to the front.

One reason for not crossing tires, when a spare is not involved in the rotation and only four drive tires are rotated, is when you cross tires, they rotate in a different direction, and that may contribute to a cord separation and tire failure, even for non-directional tires.
Tires should always be crossed (unless there are various circumstances such as directional tires, certain AWD systems, etc). The majority of tires are non-directional and can rotate in either direction while effectively eliminating the same amount of moisture/debris. Cord separation and tire failure due to rotation is simply untrue and have no correlation whatsoever. Cord separation occurs when the tire has succumbed to serious damage such as hitting a massive pothole but in most cases, such extreme damage will cause the tire to fail completely anyway.

It is very important that all tires rotate to each position on the vehicle. This ensures even wear across the whole tire and prevents the tires from becoming chopped or cupped. The front tires on FWD vehicles experience wear from pulling, turning, and braking. It is important that the tires experience both side of the front so they can wear both shoulders of the tires evenly from turning - this is because nearly all vehicles have a slight amount of negative camber in the front so that when a vehicle is turning, the entire surface of the tire is making contact with the road. Rear tires are along for the ride and experience far less wear. If you don't rotate tires the fronts will always wear out significantly faster than the rears.

I worked at a tire shop/auto shop for quite some time and have sold thousands of tires. 95% of tire shops follow the guidelines and advice of the U.S. Rubber Manufacturers Association that sets standards from tire life, tire repair, and safety records. Nissan's suggestion is fine for front to back rotates but you will not be getting maximum tire life or even wear.
 

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I agree that crossing tires during rotation would make them wear more evenly. The only concern was about crossed tires now spinning in opposite direction, but as you stated it is not more a concern for non-directional tires. Good to know for an old guy who was growing up in the previous millennium.
 

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I agree that crossing tires during rotation would make them wear more evenly. The only concern was about crossed tires now spinning in opposite direction, but as you stated it is not more a concern for non-directional tires. Good to know for an old guy who was growing up in the previous millennium.
haha No worries!
 
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