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So, that idiot light is on. This idiot is going to ask a dumb question:

If I just fill my tires up with the proper amount of air, will the light go off again?
 

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Yes, proper inflation should turn off the TPMS light. But if it comes on again, you may have a tire puncture or another problem that the light is identifying for you.
 

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OP, keep air pressure higher than posted on your door jamb. At least 5 psi over it. Otherwise normal temperature fluctuations may trigger that light again. For reference, I keep it 40 psi.
That is exactly what I do... I keep it at 38-40 pounds!!
 

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That is exactly what I do... I keep it at 38-40 pounds!!
Yes, and it causes less rolling resistance, and therefore slight increase in MPG. When some years ago gas was close to $4/gallon, and I am not talking about Cali and Hawaii, people were jacking the tire pressure up to 50 psi. Well, it was mostly for gas-guzzlers where you had to take a home equity mortgage to fill it up...
 

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Sorry to say, but overinflating your tires doesn't reduce the overall rolling resistance much, and has a host of detrimental effects. Start with accelerated wear in the center of the tire, increased risk of hydroplaning and decreased contact patch (less cornering and braking) to round it out. Overinflating by a few PSI is one thing, but going above 10 PSI is not recommended.
 

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Sorry to say, but overinflating your tires doesn't reduce the overall rolling resistance much....
Sorry to say, but you are wrong on this one. Increasing tire pressure makes tire less flex at the patch of road contact, makes that patch smaller, makes tires less overheating, and overall reduces rolling resistance.

Start with accelerated wear in the center of the tire, increased risk of hydroplaning and decreased contact patch (less cornering and braking) to round it out. Overinflating by a few PSI is one thing, but going above 10 PSI is not recommended.
I never said it is a good thing. I said about inflating to 40 psi. The mentioning of going to 50 psi was only an example of people being desperate about paying a lot of money at the pump.
 

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What myth? In my post #5 I stated that increasing tire pressure to 40 psi "... it causes less rolling resistance, and therefore slight increase in MPG."

Looking at the rolling resistance, which is directly correlated to fuel consumption, there are some researches which show that between 25 psi and 40 psi there is almost a straight line of correlation between tire pressure and rolling resistance. For that psi interval, increase in 5 psi decreases rolling resistance 13%, therefore increasing fuel economy.
Of course, it does not mean that the same increase in fuel economy, which would be significantly less, but still... I would take any fuel increase available.
 

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Sorry to say, but overinflating your tires doesn't reduce the overall rolling resistance much, and has a host of detrimental effects. Start with accelerated wear in the center of the tire, increased risk of hydroplaning and decreased contact patch (less cornering and braking) to round it out. ...
Well, it is correct about decreased contact patch, but wrong about increased risk of hydroplaning. It is just opposite. Decreased contact patch helps tires to cut through the layer of water on the road, straight to the road surface. Pretty much like a sharper knife makes a deeper cut. Of course, mind the speed...
 

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Here's a direct quote from the link you provided.

"Well, you've got to figure that, at 70 mph or so, the aerodynamic drag of the car's body is probably outweighing the small improvements the tires gave us".

Notice "the small improvements the tires gave us". Two totally different trips that could have huge differences in elevation one trip going one way the other the other way. Two different days one may have been a head wind the other a tail wind. Possibly different temperatures. And don't even get me started on what wet roads would have done for rolling resistance. I drove my Versa to my mom's house and back last Saturday the temps were in the mid-upper 50's. I made the same trip same roads with the c/c set at the same speed Tuesday when the temps were in the mid-upper 40's. My Ultra Gauge reported about a 5 MPG drop on Tuesday when the temperature was cooler. About 15 miles of this trip was on a lightly traveled 4 lane road where once I got up to speed and set the c/c it wasn't cut off until I was exiting that road. 3 more miles is lightly traveled two lane so only about 2 miles was slightly heavier traffic with about 4-5 traffic lights. I've often noticed instant MPG numbers on my Ultra Gauge between a tail wind and head wind varying by 20 MPG or more. My point is there was possibly a lot more that came into play than the article leads you to believe. Most of my driving is on the same roads/same trips from tank to tank and it's not uncommon for my fuel mileage to vary by 1-5 MPG from tank to tank. I know because I check mileage at every fill up so if mileage takes a big dip for no apparent reason I know to start checking things on the car to see what's going on.
 

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I don't like seeing over inflated tires either. You normally see people needing to replace them sooner. Spec is 33 on most Nissans. I put 35 in them if it's going to get colder. Playing with my own pressures only yielded anecdotal results, since there are tons of factors in play. People come in all the time with tires filled over the max on the side wall and I bring them down. I don't need something to happen when they leave and point at me for it.

How about nitrogen fills? Cripes, don't get me started.

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I usually have mine inflated to a minimum of 38 PSI by my gauge. When I set them at 35 it seemed like every few days to few weeks in fall/winter the TPMS light was coming on. Since I've upped the pressure I usually check them every couple months and the only time the TPMS light has been on was when I picked up a nail a couple months ago. I've ran several sets of tires above placard pressure and have never had a problem with center treadwear. Two of the tires on my Versa were put on it after I bought it Feb. 2019, they now have about 17K miles and last time I checked the pressure I also gauged the treadwear and they gauged the same at each tread block, 60 years ago when bias ply tires were what were mainly used center treadwear was more of an issue than with today's steel belted radials. Every time I get my tires rotated they lower the pressure. One time I let them go and I think it was the next day the TPMS light came on so now when I get them rotated I go straight home and air them back up.
 

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You're lucky. I see tires worn like crap 5 days a week. Unlucky that your light comes on that much, mine never does unless there's a problem.

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This happened to me over 2 autumns ago. I live in Michigan, one day the weather turn cold quickly and my tire pressure light turned on, somewhat expected so I knew what to do, add air to my tires (so I thought). Pressures were low so I added some air on them to proper pressure and drove around like always expecting the light to turn off. It didn't.

Not knowing which tire was causing the light, I thought I had a TPM sensor failure. I went to our local Discount Tire store and the person there knew exactly what to do. He set the pressure on all tires to 40psi and let me run the engine for a few minutes. The light went out, he then set the tires to the proper pressures. Something new I learned that day.
 

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There is a problem with tpms if it flashes extra long after you start the car. Setting the pressure to 35psi then driving it will turn the light off.

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Well, it is correct about decreased contact patch, but wrong about increased risk of hydroplaning. It is just opposite. Decreased contact patch helps tires to cut through the layer of water on the road, straight to the road surface. Pretty much like a sharper knife makes a deeper cut. Of course, mind the speed...
Sorry...wrong on this one...a decreased contact patch will channel out less water, that leads to more water getting under the smaller contact patch and hydro pressure will push up and cause less contact with the road and the next sound you'll hear is...Bang!
 

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So, that idiot light is on. This idiot is going to ask a dumb question:

If I just fill my tires up with the proper amount of air, will the light go off again?
First of all...do not call yourself an idiot...you're thinking...you may not have the level of automotive expertise as some of the people here but that is what makes Forums fun. I agree with the 5 psi rule, although I personally only add 3 psi extra. (so a 32psi tire spec if inflated to 35 will be ok) Now, lets have some fun...this over inflation rule only applies to local yocals like us who drive from point A to point B. On a track...lets say the Indy 500, Talladega, Formula one...even minute changes of 1/2 psi can make a difference. But we're not at that level...next time you watch a race pay attention to the commentators during a pit stop, very often you'll hear them say how the crew is adding or taking away a little as a 1/2 lb to one side only to compensate for heat and track inclination! Good luck...
 

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Sorry...wrong on this one...a decreased contact patch will channel out less water, that leads to more water getting under the smaller contact patch and hydro pressure will push up and cause less contact with the road and the next sound you'll hear is...Bang!
Decreased contact patch makes smaller footprint and increases pressure pushing your car down on the road. Therefore, you have more tire-to-road contact. This decreases your risk of hydroplaning.
Of course, the scenario you described can happen if you drive faster than your vehicle tires are able to push down through the layer of the water and retain the grip with the road.
 
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