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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The previous owner had the tire pressure set at 37 psi. The tires are pretty worn in the middle of the tread but plenty on the outside edges. I am going to install new tires soon but I rotated the tires to get that last bit of milage out of them and set the tire pressure to 26 psi to minimize tread wear in the middle until I install the new tires.

Thinking about a set of Hankook Optimo H724 Tire P205/60R15's from Wally World. I have a set of those on our Honda Element and they have been fantastic tires.

Yeah, I am being Mr. El Cheapo/Mr. Thrifty to get the most out of the tires. :sifone:

Does anyone know what the minimum tire pressure value is for the TPMS system that will not cause the warning light to illuminate? Thanks!
 

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look at the door jamb. it has the recommended pressure on it. Also, our sensors will detect when 1 tire drops below 28 PSI. There is some confusion as to whether our sensors will also light up if 1 tire is vastly different from the rest, and I am not sure. All it says in the service manual is that the light will be set off when a tire(s) drops below 28. I run 37 PSI in my tires, but I'm not on stock wheels.
 

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Generally, for passenger tires most TPMS systems by auto manufactures will illuminate when they are ~5 PSI below the recommended tire pressure. I run my OEM tires at 35psi all year around.

For the tire wear you are describing the previous owner ran the tire pressure FAR higher than 37psi. Running your tires at 26psi can be very dangerous - the low pressure can cause far too much flexing/deformity in the sidewall which can cause it to explode especially if the vehicle is heavily loaded. That is the reason Firestone tires were exploding on Ford Explorers - Ford had the psi set at 28psi to improve the NHTSA rollover rating instead of improving the vehicle itself.
 

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Shouldn't you just go ahead and buy new tires and then keep them inflated to the PSI on your door sticker? If you try running low pressures, that will increase the rolling friction, which will increase the heat that builds up inside your tire. Do you think that's a good idea with summer approaching? Tell you what. Set the fronts to 33 psi and lower the backs to 26 psi. Go for a 70 mph run and then stop after an hour. Immediately get out and put your hand on your tires. Which ones feel hotter?

It'll cost you a lot more than a set of tires if you have a blow-out and wreck. Your life rides on your tires.

Go to a used tire shop and see if they will give you a trade-in for the old tires with the remaining tread if your buy a set from them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I reset the tire pressure to 32 psi alround and took the car for a spin. After about an 1/8 of a mile the TPMS light went out. I will try gradually lowering the pressure 1 psi at a time and see what I can get away with. I suspect not much more than a psi or 2 from what it is now.
 

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I had to replace the original Continental tires after 36,000 miles. Bought Firestone touring tires (buy3 1free) and they are great. Every fall when the temp drops, the TPMS light comes on. I inflate to 40psi and it lasts a year. Some recommend 38psi. The tires say 32psi, but I have to fill them often at this level. Make sure to put air in the spare as it also has TPMS. The light goes out after a short drive and the TPMS resets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had to replace the original Continental tires after 36,000 miles. Bought Firestone touring tires (buy3 1free) and they are great. Every fall when the temp drops, the TPMS light comes on. I inflate to 40psi and it lasts a year. Some recommend 38psi. The tires say 32psi, but I have to fill them often at this level. Make sure to put air in the spare as it also has TPMS. The light goes out after a short drive and the TPMS resets.
If you haven't already, try filling your tires with nitrogen. Nitrogen is a larger molecule and does not leak down through the tire casing nearly as fast as atmospheric air. As a rule, you loose approximately 1 psi of air pressure in a tire per month. You can achieve the same with regular air but must check your tire pressure much more often as compare to nitrogen.

In a past life as a military aviator & test pilot I learned this and why nitrogen is use in aircraft tires in addition to the slower leak down rate, nitrogen gets dried (humidity removed) and reduces the possibility of moisture (read ice at altitudes above freezing) building up inside the tire.

I get the same TPMS lights on all of our vehicles every Fall/Winter after the temperatures drop noticably. A combination of Boyles and Charles law.

Try the nitro, you may find you like it better.
 

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All tpms sensor will go off when 1 or more of your tires go under 25% or more of the recommended psi. You will also set them off if the tire pressure is too high i'd say for the versa around 45 is way too much. As for tire wear, if u have too much psi tires tend to wear more in the center and setting it too low will make the tire wear more on the shoulder or outside of the tread. Obviously its best to have it set at the recommended psi to promote even wear. And finally u should check ur air pressure at least once a month and asap after there is a big change in the temperature. Going from hot weather to cold the air in ur tire will compress and u will lose psi, vis versa for cold to hot weather as the air will expand in ur tires and maybe over recommended amount.

I speak out of experience. I've been a discount tire employee for over a year and a half now and I deal with stuff like this on the daily basis
 

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If you haven't already, try filling your tires with nitrogen. Nitrogen is a larger molecule and does not leak down through the tire casing nearly as fast as atmospheric air. As a rule, you loose approximately 1 psi of air pressure in a tire per month. You can achieve the same with regular air but must check your tire pressure much more often as compare to nitrogen.

Air is already 78% Nitrogen. Putting in 100% will do little to nothing.
 

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Air is already 78% Nitrogen. Putting in 100% will do little to nothing.
I agree with you 100%.

This also is why our shop did not sell nitrogen for tires (Firestone Complete Autocare).

In addition, it is IMPOSSIBLE to put 100% nitrogen in the tire. Even if you let the tire deflate until the rim is on the ground, there is still air inside of the tire. So, this will simple dilute the nitrogren that goes into the tire....making the tire have slightly more nitrogen than a standard air compressor.

In automotive daily use, nitrogen is nothing but a waste of $ and marketing scheme.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I personally go for checking the tire pressure monthly and call it good.

I never said filling tires with nitrogen was the ultimate panecea or the best value. It depends upon the application and what the user is looking for.

If the tire is properly purged first and then filled with nitrogen, it will loose pressure at approximately 1/3 the rate a tire filled with air will.

Why Inflating Tires With Nitrogen Makes Sense

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=nitrogen-filled-tires-fuel-efficiency

The Truth About Filling Your Tires with Nitrogen | The Truth About Cars

Filling your car's tires with nitrogen not worth the added cost | Fox Business

Whether the extra cost is worth it is up to the individual. Its not worth it to me when I can just check it periodically.

My reply to Gapperguy about nitrogen was aimed primarily as a possible option at the hassle he was having maintaining tire pressure between what the recommended pressure called for vs. the pressure that kept the TMPS happy.
 
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