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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got the warning about tire pressure.
I checked it and the front tires seemed low, 30 instead of 36 on the sticker inside the door.
Back tires were okay.

I read that I was supposed to drive the car around after adding more air... but the warning persists.

Am I just doing it wrong?
 

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Mine was at the service station a few weeks ago and my light recently came on as well just as the temp went down, so yours may be the same. I believe you have to drive around almost 10 miles or go above 60mph for it to turn off after adding air (if that is the issue)
 

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36 PSI is the correct pressure for CVT trans models.

My light came on earlier in the month, my front tires were low so I topped them off, I also checked and adjusted the rear tire pressure they were down a pound in the rear. Make sure you check all four wheels you can't always judge just looking at it. Don't be afraid to let out some air and fill up the good tires I always do this so just to be thorough.

After which you need to drive the car at speeds of 16 mph + the light should go off when you reach and pass that speed.

Make sure you check the tires when they are cold. Cold tire pressure is when the car has been sitting for 3 plus hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will check on this again when the wife gets back home with the car.
She took it today. <g>

When I checked yesterday they were all fine except the front.
I expected it to resolve itself after I added air.

How does it monitor the pressure?
Is the sensor in the tire?
Long life battery and NFC or something?
 

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I will check on this again when the wife gets back home with the car.
She took it today. <g>

When I checked yesterday they were all fine except the front.
I expected it to resolve itself after I added air.

How does it monitor the pressure?
Is the sensor in the tire?
Long life battery and NFC or something?
Yes sensor is in the tire and is part of the valve stem assembly I had this same thing happen to me shortly after picking mine up from the dealer...they had forgotten to top the air in the tires off and it was late at night so didn't want to keep them from their families...went and got my air compressor topped them all off and had to drive a few miles at normal road speeds for the warning to turn off...was kinda cool getting to experience the nissan smart fill system though for the first time cause as I topped each one of the tires off to the correct pressure my car would beep at me to let me know it was done with that tire lol
 

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I hate TPMS. Can't anyone just check their tire pressure every week like people used to do? Good thing you don't own a Chrysler though, the TPMS valve stems in those break off all the time due to corrosion, and there is no separate part number for just the stem portion of the sensor, in fact they look like they can be disassembled for this purpose, because rarely does the sensor itself fail. There is an internal recall on the old style Chrysler TPMS valve stems, meaning they know it's a common problem but won't reimburse you for it. At about $140 for OEM valve stems/sensors that's pretty retarded.
 

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Just one! They suck! Lot of other manufacturers seem to use the same type of valve stem though, metal stem secured by a metal collar retaining nut. Another common way they break is from overtightening, spec is only 12 in lbs, or just enough to hold it in there, air pressure will hold it in anyways. But lots of techs reef them down like lug nuts... haha.
 

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Just one! They suck! Lot of other manufacturers seem to use the same type of valve stem though, metal stem secured by a metal collar retaining nut. Another common way they break is from overtightening, spec is only 12 in lbs, or just enough to hold it in there, air pressure will hold it in anyways. But lots of techs reef them down like lug nuts... haha.
oh wow so they're senstive lil suckers

don't wanna bring politics to the forum, but here in the USA we can thank:
Firestone, Ford, the Clinton Administration, and Congress, for passing the TREAD Act all new cars must have them, but the funny thing is when I took my car to the dealer for an oil change, actually every time I take it to get an oil change, they never say anything about my TPMS light blinking.... wierd unless I ask them to check it
 

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The TPMS sensors on Chrylsers and GM would break because of corrosion built up between the cap and the stem itself. The cap sticks to the stem and then when you apply a ton of force to it, it cracks the whole stem. This is more common in the northern states because of the road salt.

We saw it all the time and if we broke a stem on the sensor we would replace it for free. Never ever put aftermarket valve stem caps on the sensors. Different metals generally dont like touching each other and cause corrosion due to their different electrical charge.

The first thing that I did on my nissan was to put some oil on the threads of my valvestems to prevent corrosion or salt from getting in there.

As far as the reason of TPMS becoming a requirement, it wasn't actually Firestones fault. The tires were not faulty, Ford were idiots because their Explorers were getting very very poor ratings in the rollover category. Instead of doing something intelligent, Ford simply lowered the tire pressure to create a softer tire which allowed the Explorers to be able to roll more and improve the rollover rating. However, when these things were loaded down in the summer with weight, families, boats, etc, the sidewall would reach an extreme temperature and blow out. Ford was at fault - not Firestone.

Any tire that is inderinflated in high temps, with a heavy load, or traveling fast will cause the tire to explode.


A blinking TPMS light is indicating a malfunction or dead sensor. A lit up sensor is indiciating incorrect tire pressure.
 

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For a long time the first GM's with TPMS used the speed sensors to function as TPMS, if one tire is inflated below the set threshold, the speed sensor for that corner (s) would sense the differential in wheel speed between the actual speed (an underinflated tire spins slightly faster than a properly inflated tire) and a set value in a computer, setting off the light once a set threshold was reached. Pretty decent system if you ask me, and it was cheaper to implement than the wireless infrared system that everyone else was starting to implement.

Reason nobody talks to you about a blinking TPMS light is because generally blinking means either you're running wheels with regular rubber valve stems or some other internal problem, which is usually beyond the scope of most lube places. Just an infrared TPMS tester tool probably costs a pretty penny.
 
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