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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Clutch master went out today... or yesterday. Got in to start up and clutch went right to the floor. What a bitch, right when it's -20 out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That would then be my excuse for MR20 swap.
 

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damn how many miles do you have? This is the first clutch master I have heard of going out. Are you 100% positive that is what it is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No warning. I still don't know if it's the master or slave, but based on the master not being air tight when i plugged both ports and pushed in the cylinder, i'm pretty sure it is the master. Bell housing drain hole showed no signs of moisture so pretty sure it isn't the slave. I would think the engineers would hopefully have designed the slave as a lifetime part, considering the engine/tranny needs to be pulled in order to replace it... However in every production line there's that 1.0% or so probability of early failure, no matter how good production is.

Just one morning went in to start it up and pedal went right to the floor. No pressure at all even from pumping.

FYI i had to go to the dealer to order the part, as no parts houses even had a listing for it. It was only 124$ here, comes with the feed hose too, "bolt" in, don't need to transfer any parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Can happen, it is just plastic as are many parts on new cars, only retained by clips that engage on a groove on the ball.

Getting it out is simple though. Remove airbox and battery, PCM/ECU bracket (right in the way), pull off the feed line, pull out spring clip on high pressure line, then just twist clockwise 45 degrees and it comes right out.

At this point it could still be the slave, seals could be leaking internally, however i'm confident it's the master. If the master seals were fine, pumping vigorously would likely build some pressure, but i got nothing, and like i said it didn't generate any pressure when i plugged up both ports with my fingers and moved the pushrod. Bellhousing drain hole shows no evidence of moisture, dry as a bone.

Update: Got it working fine, but frankly i find the factory procedure is a little confusing at step 5 where it says "Push the lock pin (1) of the bleeding connector (2) into the locked position". The goal is to bleed the air at that connector through the way the "fitting" is made, it has little detents for the pipe to slide out and ride on the connector, factory says to slide it out 5mm, which is correct, after 5mm movement the pipe just comes out completely. But to do this you actually remove the spring clip by pulling it off, rather than pushing it in. The slave assembly must have some kind of check valve to prevent air from getting that far. Rest of it is straight forward bleeding procedure.

If you look at the diagram of the bleed connector, you'll see that what closes/blocks the bleed nipple is the inserted pipe itself. To open the nipple to allow air out, you remove the clip and slide the pipe out just enough to uncover the nipple passage. Allows air to be forced out and brake fluid to take up the space the air displaced, and get sucked back in. So you don't push the connector in you pull it off then slide the pipe out 5mm but not completely.

This also brings up the idea of removing the damper for more clutch feedback, a more aggressive feeling clutch. However with everything plastic it'd be hard to do properly.
 
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