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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who has some good advice for me on the life of a fuel pump? I have an 08 Versa hatch 6 spd manual 72k miles that I bought new. I was wondering how long the electric fuel pump tends to last? I am not having any problems with it, and the pressure regulator was replaced years ago under warranty. I am debating if it would be worthwhile to be proactive on replacing the pump. I could do it my self for a few hundred bucks and at my own leisure on a weekend, or the possibility of having it fail out of town and pay some garage 700-800$
plus towing fees, hotel costs, missing work, inconvience... etc. I don't have a lot of miles on the car but I don't know if time/age is a factor also.
 

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I never change a fuel pump until it goes out. I guess maybe it might be worth changing it before hand if you do a lot of traveling. In my experience electric fuel pumps usually last 150K+ miles and often OE parts last longer than aftermarket parts. I drove an '88 Ford Escort to 518K miles and as I recall changed the fuel pump 2 times over all those miles and about 23-24 years of driving.
 

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Unless you are always running at 1/4 tank or less, I wouldn't worry about it at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Who has some good advice for me on the life of a fuel pump? I have an 08 Versa hatch 6 spd manual 72k miles that I bought new. I was wondering how long the electric fuel pump tends to last? I am not having any problems with it, and the pressure regulator was replaced years ago under warranty. I am debating if it would be worthwhile to be proactive on replacing the pump. I could do it my self for a few hundred bucks and at my own leisure on a weekend, or the possibility of having it fail out of town and pay some garage 700-800$
plus towing fees, hotel costs, missing work, inconvience... etc. I don't have a lot of miles on the car but I don't know if time/age is a factor also.
Thanks for the input guys, that seem to be the consensus, that prob right now it is not worth worrying about. I would be better of sticking with the oem for a while yet rather than go to an after market replacement that might not even hold up as good as the original.
 

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I never change a fuel pump until it goes out. I guess maybe it might be worth changing it before hand if you do a lot of traveling. In my experience electric fuel pumps usually last 150K+ miles and often OE parts last longer than aftermarket parts. I drove an '88 Ford Escort to 518K miles and as I recall changed the fuel pump 2 times over all those miles and about 23-24 years of driving.
Drove my 88 escort to 280,000 b4 i got rid of it.. orig fuel pump
 

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I agree, these are solid pumps for the most part.

If you get your hands on a cheap scantool that can read live data, you can look at the combination of long term fuel trim and short term fuel trim to determine if your pump might be getting weak. If while warmed up, in neutral or park, those numbers combined are over 10%, and if with some rpms or load, that number goes up, there's a good chance your pump is on its way out. If you then watch your a/f sensor and rear o2 sensor while you do a wot run, the a/f voltage should go down and stay down the whole time and the o2 voltage should go up and stay there. If they don't, it's probably pump time.

Easy tests to check it anytime without getting dirty.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very interesting, I have never heard of anything like that before. I have a "Zurich ZR11" from Harbor Freight. The specs say that it streams live data, and graphs and records live data. So guess that would work for the purpose you are referring to.
 

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Yep, that'll do it! A lot of diagnosis can do be done with data if you understand the theory. Ideally you use the data to eliminate possibilities and just test what's left.

Fuel trims are one of the keys. There is a video by schrodinger's box quantum mechanics that is very good at explaining this. A full grasp on this concept puts you far ahead of most DIYers and many mechanics.

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