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My 2013 Nissan Versa SV is sitting at about 125k miles and we neglected to change the spark plugs at 100k. We have seen no issues with misfires and no engine lights, but we are changing the spark plugs this weekend like good little car owners. My question is, since changing the spark plugs in this car is a pain and we plan to use it for at least another 75k miles (hopefully), is it worth replacing the Ignition Coils at the same time? They are pretty expensive, and i have heard that they typically do not need to be replaced unless the car is misfiring or there is an engine light. And if not the whole coil, would it be worth replacing the boots, since those are about $10 each?
 

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My 2013 Nissan Versa SV is sitting at about 125k miles and we neglected to change the spark plugs at 100k. We have seen no issues with misfires and no engine lights, but we are changing the spark plugs this weekend like good little car owners. My question is, since changing the spark plugs in this car is a pain and we plan to use it for at least another 75k miles (hopefully), is it worth replacing the Ignition Coils at the same time? They are pretty expensive, and i have heard that they typically do not need to be replaced unless the car is misfiring or there is an engine light. And if not the whole coil, would it be worth replacing the boots, since those are about $10 each?
If I were you, if you want to replace the boots, fine, but replacing the coils themselves would be a waste of money. Rule of thumb........."If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
 

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Coils used to be pretty much lifetime one time only parts until some OEM designs stupidly went backwards 75 years to make them crap again. If the design is not known for shelling out quick like Ford ones (change them even more often than plugs it seems) then keep on using them. Same for boots, if the rubber seems live and supple and not crumbling, cracking, or getting stiff then use them over. Look for evidence of carbon tracking or spark shooting through the rubber to know.

I'd be making sure any contact or spark jump-off points are still clean too.
 

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If it were me, I would go ahead and change the coils that are under the intake manifold. At least that way you can replace the others if needed and not have to remove the manifold again.
 

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Not me, after looking at likely $200+ there. The coils are single units which means most designs never go bad and wasteful if they are not already bad. You have far more other issues to spend on before it is all done.

Most of the coil is in the extension plastic, which can easily be replaced with simple normal plug wire there. The coil body is above the surface which lets it run cooler and may save it from ever dying. Coils are simple enough you likely get either connector or output end problems only and they can be rebuilt by somebody like me for pennies to have a frankenstein coil that would nevertheless work forever after 'fixing' it.

The intake comes off easy and can more than once as the gasket is cheap and unless incompetent it can come off several times before something goes wrong.

Still wondering about this........

' At least that way you can replace the others if needed...'

If you have already changed them you likely would never do it again. Unless someone DOES have proof that they are ones known to fail early, in that case I would flip on my decision but likely no need to. I referred to Ford issues as they have figured out new ways to corrupt very dependable parts to go back to early failures like no one on earth. Until somebody shows me more proof I so far do not expect that from Nissan, not yet anyway. All things are possible though. Until then you go the way that saves the money, freaking out to spend $200 for no known reason is not thinking, it's silly.

If the coils were those that were known for going bad maybe yes, but most designed like that still last as long as the old school ones did, or until and past the end of the car.

Be guided by what you see when the coils come out, if needing change they will show signs of exposure to temperature, that will be your need to change them.
 
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