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my car had that job recently done(sub frame, control arms, etc..) and now soemtimes when im hitting the brakes, i have to tilt the steering wheel a little bit to the right. Did they did something wrong at the dealership??.

Greetings from Mexico
 

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I'm sorry for bringing back an old thread, but I found out yesterday that my subframe bushings are going bad. Now, the other techs I work with all say I have to replace the whole things (I work for a Nissan Dealer) yet I can find the bushings online. Has anyone replaced these? How easy was it?

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2010 Versa owner here. 86K miles. Just told by my dealer that the bushings in the subframe/crossmember need replaced and I have to buy the whole part. $1K installed. They also told me I need to replace the strut bearings to the tune of $600+ installed, plus an alignment. This is the kind of thing I expect from a 150K+ mile car, not a 86K mile car. Calling my independent shop for a 2nd opinion, but seriously, this is the first and last Nissan I'll ever buy.
Exactly. When my wife's car gets back from the dealership tomorrow with its replacement CVT that failed at 45,000 miles, we're dumping the car. We're going to take a bath on it, but this thing has had so many problems.
 

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have pressed out bushing and replced with new ones...they work fine.

If you search the net you can find bushings made of polyurethane...Good luck
 

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Did you have to un bolt the power steering assembly just to drop the subframe out ? The repair manual makes a mention of it ... and I don't even know where to begin to access the nut side of those 2 bolts
 

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It's likely the nuts are welded onto whatever they pull up against. Or clipped in place. Common. There may be no need to get to them at all. Loosen the bolts and if they keep coming further out keep on going.

I myself will be doing similar to post #25 , silly to buy entire subframe over bushings alone. Those parts are too easy to come up with out of the blue. Same with strut bearings, everybody 'changes' them, so far all I've ever done is relube them after cleaning and throw them back in the cars if not damaged. The last 4 different cars I've done that on now. So far I haven't realigned either but if needed I do that myself as well.

They tell you you MUST have this or that and often it's simply not true if you know how cars work.
 

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I was told that both my rear bushings are shot and in need of replacement. There's a lot of creaking when going over bumps, and squeaking when cornering and going over bumps as well. There's also a lot of wandering at highway speeds. My question is, are the rear bushings on a 2013 Versa as difficult and pricey to replace? I see tons of videos and online content referring to front and sub frame bushings...But not much in regards to rear bushings. What bothers me is that my car only has 64,000 miles on it. I know bushings degrade over time, but this soon?
 

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Since you're in magnesium chloride country (road salt), just curious if did you do any undercoating? That stuff is wrecking havoc on cars!
 

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If the bushing are bad all you have to do is unbolt the bolts holding the bushing in, loosen the subfram bolts a bit and let it drop down and hold it open with a block of wood. UTube has at least two videos on the process, All you have to do is replace the bushing which cost under 50 bucks on ebay. Those 1000-1200 quotes are total ripoffs. two hours tops. I would check the torque mounts and the engine mounts as well as the transmission mounts when you are working on the car as they may be going as well, total parts for everything are under 200 dollars on ebay.
 

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The parts are cheap on ebay, the process is on Utube. as to the 64,000 miles, nissan makes low quality parts for a lot of its cars and always has including this one.
 

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Hi joey, designokc, lot101 and amc49 (and anyone else who's completed this job),

So I don't have any power tools and I don't want to get stuck halfway. Was hoping you can give me a few pointers:

1. Which exact bushings did you buy that fit?
I'm leery of getting the wrong part since there's some confusion.

2. Are the bushings able to be pressed out without special tools?
In the youtube video it seems like it was rusted on the subframe and the guy had to burn the bushing and used power tools... if that's the case it's beyond my expertise.

3. What was the main symptom that you had with this problem?
I hear a single metal on metal "clunk" from underneath when driving over a bump/dip, both with the wheel turned and straight. I've had my car checked with 2 mechanics and they've told me non-definitively it may be a strut vs. control arm but that I can "wait until I hear the noise more often" - which seems like they're unable to confirm their diagnosis with visual inspection. Both struts were replaced with KYB struts at 90k (now at 115k) so I'm not sure the longevity I should expect with aftermarket struts. Control arms are still original.

Thanks in advance for any tips. I have a 2008 hatchback if that helps.
 

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Hello all,

I'm currently doing the subframe bushing and control arms on my 2011 versa. I've decided to drop the subframe for better access to the bushings. The only problem is the power steering rack. It has two bolts that hold it to the subframe that are not easily reachable for me, Plus they look very rusted.

Now my question, can I just disconnect the intermediate shaft at the bottom (within the car) and drop the subframe + steering rack as one piece?
If not, any ideas on how to remove the bolts that are holding the power steering rack in?

I circled the bolts in question in red.
 

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Leave rack attached to frame but disconnect the lines to it. The entire plate has to be re-aligned straight to the car before tightening it down, there will be some method for doing so. Usually specialty pins stuck in lineup holes on the part and car body.
 

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Disconnect the intermediate shaft bottom bolt from inside and lower the whole subframe . Make sure O2 sensor wire is removed from the subframe bracket before lowering.
You can remove the rack bolt once you have the subframe outside. I just did this on my 2010 versa . Removing rack nut iss easier once the frame is outside.
Can change the sway bar bushing as well. Main bushings can be pressed out and replaced with either dorman bushings or poly..your choice.
Good luck.
 

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Wall of text!

Sub-frame and bushing replacement story.

I recently purchased this 2011 nissan versa (101k miles) from a repo auction $2,500. After getting the car for the auction, the first thing I did was to change the oil and get new tires to get the car on the road.
Unfortunately, I failed my inspection because of a sub-frame bushing. I did some research and decided to try and tackle it myself.
At first I tried to partially drop the sub frame and get the bushing out, NO LUCK, thanks to NY salt. So after doing a little more research, dropping the entire sub frame seemed easy enough….. argh!
During the sub-frame bushing replacement, I encountered 3 major problems and 1 minor one.

1st Major problem, the lower ball joints
It was next to impossible to separate from the knuckle. Again, thanks to NY salt. I tried Large hammers and mallets, I even tried to jack up the knuckle while having a ratching tie-down strapped around the lower control arm and the base of the jack. No luck.

I eventually got 2 pickle forks and had to hammer both in from opposite direction to separate the joint. Of course, the pickle forks destroyed the ball joint. It’s at this point I decide to order two new Moog lower control arms.

During re-assembly, The Moog control arms bolted into the sub frame and knuckle without issues. I did load up the post on the ball joint with lots of anti-seize before I re-installed them.


2nd Major problem, removing bushings
After removing the sub-frame out of the car, I encountered the next Major issue. It was removing the old bushings. Here in NY they were fused to the sub-frame. I highly recommend lots of Heat (map gas)+ 1-1/8 socket and a large hammer. This combination very successful.

3rd Major Issue, Putting the bushings back in
The 3 Major issue, was trying to get the new bushing back in….. complete failure. I used a very large bolt and lots of washer to try and pull the bushing into the sub-frame. At one point, I heard a very large pop that came from the sub-frame, like a weld had broken. I inspected a bit, but did not see any damage. Then a few minutes after that the pulling bolt I was using snapped in half with the first bushing only about 70% seated……..

I’m not proud of it, but the stress of getting this car back operational during the weekend started to impact me. I made the decision to just purchase a new sub-frame, and even worse, from the dealer. $$$$+first born

Luckily a local dealer had the part and I could put the car back together that day.


The 1 minor issue is with my steering wheel. It now sits off about 25 degrees. I took what I thought were the correct steps to prevent this. I kept my steering wheel from moving, and used a paint marker to mark the lower steering joint and steering gear orientations. However, my steering wheel is still off by 25 degrees when the wheels are straight.
I’ll have to inspect further to see what’s going on. I’ll also will need an alignment very soon.

Lessons learned and things I might try differently.
1) Sanding out the sub-frame bushing hole a little better to cut down on the friction while inserting the bushing.
2) Unbolting the control arms from the sub-frame and leave them on the knuckle.
3) Having the new bushings professionally press into the sub-frame.
 

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You likely ignored post #34 and why the wheel is so far off. That plate absolutely cannot just bolt down anywhere, it MUST align to the rest of the unibody or your issue. If you now try to align the car with that plate crooked it will even be worse. On alignment check the caster will now be off a mile too. The wheels may be straight but very likely as well that one is slightly ahead of the other now too.
 

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The rack and sub-frame had no pins or noticeable dimples to assist in mating them together... that I saw. However I think you maybe on it. A slightly shifted rack would cause the steering wheel to be slightly skewed.

In my case the rack is shifted left, causing the steering wheel to turn slightly left. (like turning into a skid, if you can envision it) Great catch on that amc49!

I went through the Power Steering guide and didn't see any mention of a Rack-to-sub-frame alignment procedure. I wounder if there is not and alignment procedure for this car, and the steering correcting is done via the tie-rod adjustments and/or adjusting the intermediate shaft connection to the upper Steering Column assembly.

As for the caster i think i'm safe on this car. The rack pulls the tires left and right. The subframe-to-contorl arm is what I think controls the caster. You might be able to tweak it at the top for strut tower, but I haven't touched that... Does that sound correct, or am I missing it?

If anyone have any kinda of guide that has Rack-to-sub-frame alignment procedure please pass it along.

Thanks for the input.
 

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The caster can only be changed by moving that plate, the strut top will not move it that far.

The plate controls all the LCA points in space and needs to be straight, simple moves on ties will not correct that.

Look for holes in the plate that then have matching holes in the car frame itself.

I see absolutely nothing in the service manual about it and who is surprised about that? It still may be a problem, I fix things like that with no direction all day long. You just gotta work it out. On Fords I use select fit deep well sockets picked to be very tight in the holes to line it back up. They go back on and the steering wheel is dead straight and no need for alignment at all. But then I align my cars using no machine too; they drive perfectly.
 
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